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Biography

Jack Bruce

JACK BRUCE. The composer, the singer, the multi-instrumentalist, the Legend. Hailed as one of the most powerful vocalists and greatest bassists of his time, his improvisational skill and utterly unique, free-spirited approach to composition and performance would forever change electric music. His pioneering, full-toned, free-wheeling playing on the electric bass revolutionised the way the instrument is used and influenced the playing of countless bassists to today, including Sting and Jaco Pastorius. His work with bands such as Cream and the Tony Williams Lifetime, as well as his solo material, unlocked the doors to the pent-up energy of a new approach to the art of sound, breaking the barriers of tradition and creating a kind of music that had never been heard.

Jack was born to musical parents in the shipbuilding city of Glasgow, Scotland on 14 May 1943. His parents travelled extensively in Canada and the U.S.A. Jack attended 14 different schools, finishing his formal education at Bellahouston Academy and the Royal Scottish Academy of Music, to which he won a scholarship for cello and composition. He left the Academy and his homeland at the age of 16, because of poverty and discouraged by his professors' lack of interest in his ideas.

Jack travelled to Italy and then England, playing double-bass in dance bands and jazz groups, and joined his first important band in 1962 in London. This was Alexis Korner's Blues Inc. with whom Charlie Watts, later to join the Rolling Stones, was their drummer. Jack left Alexis in 1963 to form a group with organist Graham Bond, guitarist John McLaughlin and drummer Ginger Baker. This group became the seminal Graham Bond Organisation after John left, and saxophonist Dick Heckstall-Smith joined. Jack was compelled to leave this band after three years by Ginger Baker, who said his playing was "too busy"!

Jack had to turn down Marvin Gaye's offer to join his U.S.-based band because of his impending first marriage. He then joined John Mayall's Blues Breakers, where he first met Eric Clapton, followed by Manfred Mann in an ill-advised attempt at commercialism. It was Ginger Baker who initially asked Jack to form a trio with Eric Clapton. Eric insisted that Jack would be the singer.

Cream went on to sell 35,000,000 albums in just over two years and was awarded the first ever platinum disc for Wheels of Fire. Jack wrote and sang most of the songs, including "I Feel Free", "White Room", "Politician" and perhaps the world's most performed guitar riff, in "Sunshine Of Your Love". Cream split in November 1968 at the height of their popularity; Jack felt that he had strayed too far from his ideals and wanted to re-discover his musical and social roots.

Website: Jack Bruce

Bill Lordan

By all accounts, Bill Lordan's drumming career practically happpened "by accident"… His 6th grade class needed a drummer for the marching band. Bill reluctantly vol-unteered. This big first step was encouraged by one Sister Thomas-Martin, and her rudimentary lesson in time-keeping was just the spark that young Bill needed to make a career out of drumming.

Bill's first kit came for Christmas at age 12, and by the next year Bill was already performing on stage with bands in and around his hometown of Minneapolis. Summer 1964 found Bill playing with his first big soul band called the Amazers, and a new friend on bass - Willie Weeks.

A few years later, Bill was asked to join the Esquires, and did quite a bit of touring up and down the Atlantic coastline. He was sporting a black hairdo in 1968, the same year the band received a gold record for the LP "Get Up and Get Away". The next year, Bill met up with his pal Willie once again and decided to form the group The Mystics - a great band featuring a brass section. In fact, they won a Connie Award that year, an honor bestowed to the state's best talent. It was at this time that Bill and Willie had the chance to meet and jam with Jimi Hendrix. The two were invited to New York City, and the infamous Cafe Au-Go-Go for the sessions.

Yearning to play more rock music, Bill joined Gypsy from 1970-1973. Releasing three albums during that period ("Antithesis", "In the Garden", and "Unlock the Gates"), Gypsy was often described as a band ahead of it's time - and now, years later, still has a cult following. Bill was flown out to the West coast for session work with Bobby Womack and Ike & Tina Turner, when he was discovered by Sly Stone, and immediately recruited as part of the Family Stone for their "Small Talk" LP in 1974. The subsequent touring carried him around the world, but Bill's fondest memory is Sly's wedding on-stage at Madison Square Garden in New York

By all accounts, Bill Lordan's drumming career practically happpened "by accident"… His 6th grade class needed a drummer for the marching band. Bill reluctantly vol-unteered. This big first step was encouraged by one Sister Thomas-Martin, and her rudimentary lesson in time-keeping was just the spark that young Bill needed to make a career out of drumming.

Bill's first kit came for Christmas at age 12, and by the next year Bill was already performing on stage with bands in and around his hometown of Minneapolis. Summer 1964 found Bill playing with his first big soul band called the Amazers, and a new friend on bass - Willie Weeks.

A few years later, Bill was asked to join the Esquires, and did quite a bit of touring up and down the Atlantic coastline. He was sporting a black hairdo in 1968, the same year the band received a gold record for the LP "Get Up and Get Away". The next year, Bill met up with his pal Willie once again and decided to form the group The Mystics - a great band featuring a brass section. In fact, they won a Connie Award that year, an honor bestowed to the state's best talent. It was at this time that Bill and Willie had the chance to meet and jam with Jimi Hendrix. The two were invited to New York City, and the infamous Cafe Au-Go-Go for the sessions.

Yearning to play more rock music, Bill joined Gypsy from 1970-1973. Releasing three albums during that period ("Antithesis", "In the Garden", and "Unlock the Gates"), Gypsy was often described as a band ahead of it's time - and now, years later, still has a cult following. Bill was flown out to the West coast for session work with Bobby Womack and Ike & Tina Turner, when he was discovered by Sly Stone, and immediately recruited as part of the Family Stone for their "Small Talk" LP in 1974. The subsequent touring carried him around the world, but Bill's fondest memory is Sly's wedding on-stage at Madison Square Garden in New York.

Bill is currently spearheading a brand new project called The Bill Lordan Experiment. Featuring virtuoso guitarist Eric Turner and bassist Mark Fry, the band has produced two CD's so far. BLX is rooted in blues-rock, and is bound to please many ardent fans of his drumming technique. Bill has come a long way by "accident", and brings a ton of experience into the new millennium.

Source: Bill Lordan Bio - Charlie Souza

Robin Trower

Robin Leonard Trower (born 9 March 1945) is an English rock guitarist and vocalist who achieved success with Procol Harum during the 1960s, and then again as the bandleader of his own power trio known as Robin Trower.

Robin Trower was born in Catford, London, but grew up in Southend-on-Sea, Essex. In 1962, he formed a group that became The Paramounts, later including Westcliff High School pupil Gary Brooker. The Paramounts disbanded in 1966 to pursue individual projects. During this time, Trower created a local three-piece band called the Jam (not to be confused with the later group with Paul Weller). Trower then joined Brooker's new band Procol Harum following the success of their debut single "A Whiter Shade of Pale" in 1967, remaining with them until 1971 and appearing on the group's first five albums.

Before launching his eponymous band, he joined singer Frankie Miller, ex-Stone the Crows bassist/singer James Dewar, and former Jethro Tull drummer Clive Bunker to form the short-lived combo Jude. This outfit did not record and soon split up.

Trower retained Dewar as his bassist, who took on lead vocals as well, and recruited drummer Reg Isidore (later replaced by Bill Lordan) to form the Robin Trower Band in 1973.

Perhaps Trower's most famous album is Bridge of Sighs (1974). This album, along with his first and third solo albums, was produced by his former Procol Harum bandmate, organist Matthew Fisher. Despite differences, Trower's early power trio work was noted for Hendrixesque influences. Trower is an influential guitarist who has inspired other guitar legends such as Robert Fripp, who praised him for his bends and the quality of his sounds, and took lessons from him.

In the early 1980s, Trower teamed up with former Cream bassist Jack Bruce and his previous drummers Lordan and Isidore, for two albums, BLT (Bruce, Lordan, Trower) and Truce (Trower, Bruce, Isidore). After those albums, he released another album with James Dewar on vocals titled Back It Up in 1983. Robin Trower was dropped from Chrysalis Records afterwards.

Trower was also a part of the Night of the Guitars II European tour in 1991, organised by Sting and The Police manager Miles Copeland. The tour featured Ronnie Montrose, Rick Derringer, Saga's Ian Crichton, Dave Sharman, Jan Akkerman and Laurie Wisefield.

Thirteen albums later, Trower's album, Living Out of Time (2004), featured the return of veteran bandmates Dave Bronze on bass, vocalist Davey Pattison (formerly with Ronnie Montrose's band Gamma) and Pete Thompson on drums—the same line-up as the mid-1980s albums Passion and Take What You Need.

With the same bandmates, Trower gave a concert on his 60th birthday in Bonn, Germany. The concert was recorded by the German television channel WDR. It was then released on DVD and subsequently on CD throughout Europe and later the US under the title Living Out of Time: Live. Trower toured the United States and Canada in the summer and autumn of 2006.

In 2007, Trower released a third recording with Jack Bruce, Seven Moons, featuring Gary Husband on drums. A 2008 world tour began in Ft. Pierce, Florida on 16 January 2008. Joining Davey Pattison and Pete Thompson was Glenn Letsch (formerly of Gamma) playing bass. European dates began in April. The show of 29 March 2008 at the Royal Oak Music Theater in Royal Oak, Michigan was released as a double album on V12 Records.

Trower has described James Brown as his "big hero", particularly Brown's early work "where blues is crossing over into rock and roll".

In 2016, he enjoyed a successful tour of the US. On 20 March 2018, Trower played a show at the Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts in Annapolis, Maryland. Ten minutes later (approximately 9:00PM EST) after playing back to back songs "Day of The Eagle" and "Bridge of Sighs", he announced on his microphone that he was not feeling well, handed his guitar to a stage crew, walked backstage and collapsed. He was transported by ambulance to the hospital for treatment.

News | Robin Trower | TrowerPower

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