Biography

The Children were always crying in the cattle cars, so you could imagine the surprise of his parents while Daniel Schwartz remained as mute as a jackalope. He didn’t utter a single word until he was well into his adolescence. Daniel had taken a liking to his father’s ukelele, banging out rough versions of the gypsy songs his family sang around campfires. These were the only noises he made. On the eve of his 13th birthday, the train his family was riding pulled into Nashville. As the others tried to figure out where they would sleep, Daniel wandered into an old theatre. There was a dusty old piano on the stage. His first song poured out of him that night. With the music and words swirling around his dreams, Daniel knew he needed a voice to release the imprisoned thoughts in his mind. As the family reached the deep south of Baton Rouge Louisiana, his dream came true. Alison Wadsworth was a girl unlike any he had met before. She had been raised in the swamps, but set out on her own as soon as she could raise her thumb to hitch hike. Performing on top of an old soap box, Daniel witnessed a sweet fusion of country song and baptist style preaching. Daniel had found his muse, and quit traveling to accompany her during their, now famous street side performances on his ukelele and later, acoustic guitar. It was during this time that Daniel began writing songs more seriously. First Alison sang everything, but after a while, Daniel meekly threw in simple harmonies, until one day the two burst forth in song. The power exuding from their connection was immediately apparent to pianist and vocalist, Peter Burton, who, along with Demian Mason (bass), Tim Arnold (drums), and Jake Weiss (guitar), made up the eclectic band “Cowboy.” The band was on a national tour for their second album, Ragweed and Raw Women, and looking for an opener. Peter asked if the duo would join them, and they obliged. It wasn’t long before they were all performing together on stage, and Unlikely Cowboy was born. They all currently reside in the mean streets of Philadelphia, where they have developed a reputation as troubadors and are frequently seen marching through the streets singing civil war battle hymns in six part harmony.

Edited by ergopropter on 4 Mar 2010, 08:07

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