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(For another artist see Deadbeats)
there are three very different bands under the name of The Deadbeats.


1) The Deadbeats (1978)

The Deadbeats were an early LA art punk band on the legendary Dangerhouse Records label. In 1978 they released their first and only EP titled Kill The Hippies.

Members:
Scott Guerin: vocals
Geza X (Geza X and the Mommymen): guitar
Pat Delaney (BPeople, The Romans): sax
Pasquale Amadeo: bass
Shaun Guerin: drums

Scott Guerin: “If not for a string of chance events the Deadbeats may never have come into existence. My brother was asked to play drums for a band called The Whores for the battle of the bands sequence in Cheech and Chong’s Up In Smoke movie. Except he went and got himself grounded for cutting class too much and couldn’t do it. So I filled in for him. This lineup was scheduled to play the Whisky but then the singer was forced to back out under the advice of his lawyer. It seems he was involved in a lawsuit with the Whisky so playing there would constitute a conflict of interest. There was only one course of action to take. I moved to vocals and my brother was brought back to fill the drum slot. For me as a singer this was literally on-the-job training as I had never even thought about singing before and truthfully was pretty awful. After a few sporadic shows our guitarist Hilary Haines up and quit and moved to San Francisco. Pat Delaney and I decided to change the name of the band to the Deadbeats.

Nickey Beat (drummer for the Weirdos) had the f***ing nerve to recommend one Geza X to us and against better judgement we listened. Geza had just been booted out of the Bags for farting out of key or something equally criminal. I may have been responsible for the original sound and concept for the band but the addition of Geza gave us a rawer, harder edge than we ever had before.”

Geza X: “Besides the musical sophistication, the best thing about the Deadbeats was the staging. There were no bands doing elaborate things with costumes and props in the early punk scene and we did amazing visuals. Scott was the weirdest dresser on the scene, someone who might wear an impeccable chef’s outfit to a gig or even a party; and he had a complete collection of those novelty items you order from the back of comic books, like fake dog doo and whoopee cushions. Some people mistook his style for Glitter and that was a no-no in the early days but the cool people all got that it was dada.

One time at the Masque, as an intro to the song “Brainless”, we wheeled out a mannequin on a cart and proceeded to cut its skull open to reveal several handfuls of blood drenched cow’s brains, some of which ended up on an unsuspecting audience. Somehow the photographs of that show came out with that magic glow you see in the finest performance art books and we used them on many a flyer.

Another time before a show at the Whisky, we were at the beach and there had been a major storm the night before. I collected a huge mass of abnormally large seaweed and washed it off so it was slimy but clean. During the show that night, I went in to the “Mean Mr. Mommyman” routine to the usual heckling from the “real” punks (the lizard brains who used to come on weekends and show how cool they were). So I ran behind my amp and grabbed two hefty trash bags, from which I heaved a lot of seaweed right into the audience. At first they thought it was rubber, but when it made contact and the smell got around, panic set in and everyone moved way back so there was a large open space in the front. I said something smartarse like “Oh, did it get on you? Just wait a minute…” and ran up the stairs to the backstage area where I had hidden the piece de resistance from everyone (including the band). I came back down the stairs thump, thump, thump dragging a single, perfectly shaped seaweed bulb, the kind with a pointy ball and fins, except this was the granddaddy of all life on earth, being about 11 feet long and about 3 feet wide. To everyone’s fascinated revulsion, I chucked it into the slam pit where it exploded in a pile of goo. There was a moment of absolute silence after that. Somehow, that stands out as one of the most hilarious moments of my life.”

Shaun Guerin: “I’ll never forget the time my brother, Scott, kicked Geza off the stage at the Whisky for doing really corny rock star poses, and the cable, still attached to his amp, pulled it off the speaker cabinet. It came crashing to the ground yet still kept on working. Geza continued to play from down in the audience as though nothing had happened.”

2) The Deadbeats (1994)

The downtempo Nottingham band Deadbeats consist of Damian Stanley and David Estella.

The guys that wrote funky for you and various other classic chill out tracks…
They have been featured on acclaimed compilations by the likes of Mr. Scruff and Nightmares on Wax. They are DJ’s originally from the days of The Garage in Nottingham.
They Released two albums one in the 90’s called ‘Loungin’
and one in 2009 called ‘Made in the shade’ on Wax on Records…

http://www.myspace.com/thedeadbeatsareback


3) The Deadbeats

Swedish rock’n’oll band in the vein of the Hellacopters, the Sewergrooves and else.

Members:
Micke Kniven - Drums
Andreas A - Guitar/Vox
Claes - Bas
Andreas S - Guitar

http://www.myspace.com/thedeadbeatssweden

Edited by stoner_man on 2 Aug 2010, 17:40

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