SOTTOFASCIASEMPLICE (SFS) is a music project launched in 1995 for the labels Paranoise and RTP. One of the trademarks of the band - which has never performed live - is the virtual anonymity of its members, along the lines of “active impersonalism”.

All albums have been recorded with the precious and fruitful cooperation of a number of international musicians, and have been produced in Italy, the US, Egypt and Japan.

SFS has also participated in various projects in Italy, the US and Japan both as production and composition, including work with numerous DJs for electronic dance music, and also contributed to various independent movie scores.

From 1995 through 2006, Paranoise/RTP published various demos and four albums by SFS: Gambadilegno (1998), Perseo (1999), Crociato (2000), Idrovolante (2006), Filospinato (2007). The latest album, Filospinato (Barbed wire), is a far more political and seemingly nationalistic album compared to the former, more personally oriented works. At first it appears as a very direct and sometimes cutting call to arms directed to the Italian people, at a time of great doubt, confusion and lack of confidence in the future. Nevertheless - as usual - there’s always a “twist”.

Influences

Sounds Like Although the true basics could be traced back to electronic 70s and 80s sounds like Gary Newman, Soft Cell, Visage and especially visionary electronic film scores by John Carpenter, SFS remains strongly tied to hard rock and punk sounds like Motorhead, Exploited, UK Subs, etc. All the same, especially during the period they recorded in the UK, SFS were very influenced by more gothic sounds like Sol Invictus, Death in June, etc. Since the second album Perseo (1999), SFS has been trying to return to a more electronic and “dancy” sound.

The last album, “Filospinato” is the result of a nearly complete switch of approach. While the structure of the songs still follows the SFS basics, all the ryhtmic section has given way to electronics. The use of italian, generally difficult to fit to rock rythms, had been pushed to more theatrical and operatic tones in the album “Idrovolante”. Now with “Filospinato” it has been replaced by an aggressive and declamatory use of the language, similar in some ways to what you would find in the often exaggerated and almost martial style of the italian 1920s.

Read more: http://www.myspace.com/sottofasciasemplice#ixzz0x5O2VPG1

Edited by [deleted user] on 19 Aug 2010, 20:31

All user-contributed text on this page is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.
Text may also be available under the GNU Free Documentation License.

Factbox

Generated from facts marked up in the wiki.

No facts about this artist

You're viewing version 1. View older versions, or discuss this wiki.

You can also view a list of all recent wiki changes.

More Information

From other sources.

Links
Other spellings