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 +http://starmen.net/
 +http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EarthBound
 +http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Music_of_the_EarthBound_series
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EarthBound, known in Japan as Mother 2: Gyiyg no Gyakushū, is a role-playing video game published by Nintendo for the Super NES video game console in 1994. Keiichi Suzuki and Hirokazu Tanaka reprised their roles from Mother as composers for the game, and were joined by Hiroshi Kanazu; it was the second and last game that Suzuki has composed for and the first for Kanazu. In an interview with Weekly Famitsu, Keiichi Suzuki commented on how the SNES gave the composers much more freedom to compose what they wanted than the NES, which made development of the music for EarthBound much easier than for its predecessor. This freedom was partially a result of the larger memory space available, because one of the many problems the composers had in the first game was trying to get all of their music on to the cartridge. Another advantage was that the SNES could support playing eight notes at the same time, which when combined with the increased sound quality meant that he could compose music for the game in a similar fashion to how he would compose music for real life. Suzuki cited John Lennon as an influential figure to all the composers while the soundtrack was being developed, as his songs about love matched up with the feeling of the game. EarthBound, known in Japan as Mother 2: Gyiyg no Gyakushū, is a role-playing video game published by Nintendo for the Super NES video game console in 1994. Keiichi Suzuki and Hirokazu Tanaka reprised their roles from Mother as composers for the game, and were joined by Hiroshi Kanazu; it was the second and last game that Suzuki has composed for and the first for Kanazu. In an interview with Weekly Famitsu, Keiichi Suzuki commented on how the SNES gave the composers much more freedom to compose what they wanted than the NES, which made development of the music for EarthBound much easier than for its predecessor. This freedom was partially a result of the larger memory space available, because one of the many problems the composers had in the first game was trying to get all of their music on to the cartridge. Another advantage was that the SNES could support playing eight notes at the same time, which when combined with the increased sound quality meant that he could compose music for the game in a similar fashion to how he would compose music for real life. Suzuki cited John Lennon as an influential figure to all the composers while the soundtrack was being developed, as his songs about love matched up with the feeling of the game.

Sources 2, 25 Nov 2009, 18:00 Sources 3, 1 Dec 2009, 20:37

Current Version (version 5, 18 Aug 2011, 07:42)

See the respective articles for Keiichi Suzuki, Hirokazu Tanaka, Hiroshi Kanazu and Toshiyuki Ueno.