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Biography

There are more than one band called "Hunting Lodge"

1) Hunting Lodge was one of the earliest diy electronic industrial bands in the 80s American underground.

In the early 1980’s Port Huron, Michigan gave birth to a musical collective of underground electronic artists. Spearheading this movement was the experimental/industrial band Hunting Lodge, founded by members Lon C Diehl and Richard Skott. Lon, a record store manager and B-movie enthusiast, came from the short-lived experimental band Hate/Grey while punk rock guitarist Skott cut his teeth on an earlier project called Screw Machine. In 1982, Lon and Skott launched S/M Operations. Initially a vehicle to release a magazine, S/M Operations became a DIY label for their own recordings. They also released music by noise artist Shame Exposure and outsider music legend John North Wright.

Lon always preferred showing the darker side of human emotions. The early days of Hunting Lodge found the band mining a very different and dark form of electronic angst. Heavily influenced by Throbbing Gristle, SPK, and other industrial chain-smokers , Hunting Lodge created their own blend of sonic assault.

Their first live appearance took place in September of 1982 at the Harrington Ballroom inside the Harrington Hotel, a building with a unique blend of Romanesque, Classical and Queen Anne architecture. This was the perfect setting for the layers of tribal rhythms and unearthly guttural screams that would fill the auditorium. The event was recorded on a portable cassette player and would become their first release.

2)"Hunting Lodge" were formed in 2004, as a poor excuse for founding members Paul Brown and Dan Chandler to indulge their tastes for post punk, The Jesus Lizard, Arab on Radar and attention seeking idiot-theatrics. Now, after 5 years and a series of line-up changes, only the latter remains a recognisable influence.

A year later, having settled into it’s current line-up, of Dan Chandler, Seth Cooke, Clive Henry and Dan Bennett, Hunting Lodge began to tour the UK and europe gaining a reputation as an unpredictable live band dealing in chaos, noise and cheap transcendence. Bored of the tropes of angry-white-man rock and more intent on getting a crowd to react, and ideally dance, the band began to sculpt their noise into rhythmic and melodic hooks, stolen or adapted from anthemic rock, house music, Albert Ayler, and chart R&B. This approach produced the material on their second album, Energy Czar, which saw them make the Radio 1 Peel Memorial festive 50 and rerelease the album in America through Yosada Records.

After Energy Czar however, the difficulty of practicing together while dispersed across the UK meant that the band temporarily split for a year. They finally deciding to reform, only without rehearsals when offered a gig by Bristol’s Illegal Seagull clubnight. The band now plays largely improvised sets, drawing from a stock of elements from album tracks, covers and blind chance. Despite a stint backing Damo Suzuki, as one band in his ever-changing “network”, Jazz Oddyssey indulgence has largely been avoided in favour of hooks and big satisfying rhythms, all tempered by inate contrariness, and a taste for the always hovering threat of collapse. Hunting Lodge are currently working on new tracks with Bristolian-savant and plague bearer Team Brick.

Members of Hunting Lodge also play in Defibrillators, Xulsigiae, Dethscalator and the Boduf Songs touring band.
Hunting Lodge from USA. Akin to Big Black, Hunting Lodge uses compressed noise and electronic drums. "Carnivora!" rocks a lot in overloading melodious chanting with laborious grunts for discomfort.

# Releases:
# Carnivora! CDEP (Permis de Construiere Deutschland)
# Necropolis CD (Dark Vinyl)
# Nomad Souls LP (S/M Operations 1984)
# The Harvest C (S/M Operations 1985)
# 8-Ball LP (S/M Operations 1987)
# This Is Truth 12" (Normal 1987)
# Will CD (Dark Vinyl 1992)

: S O U N D :

I had listened to music for a number of years, but it wasn’t until I heard SPK and TG, and read the propaganda associated with the two bands that I really felt someone was doing something very unique with music…there was a lot of bands I was listening to at the time who were probably almost as influential such as Pop Group, Pere Ubu, Residents, 23 Skidoo, “No New York” compilation, Dome, and a bunch of horror soundtracks—“The Shining”, parts of “Alien”, etcetera. I really don’t feel an alliance with anyone…perhaps SPK for realistic reasons…Motorhead I quite like, this Foetus album “Hole”, the Swans a bit, SPK, I like Yello…not so much the most recent album, but the one that came out in 1983. It really changed the way I think about pop music. And since that album I’ve listened to a lot of hip-hop music although it’s kind of getting stale by now. I listen to a lot of soundtracks, the Stooges, some of the more recent Laibach things, various rhythmic and ethnic musics, and of course Herb Alpert before he sold out.
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