Welsh singer Yestyn Griffiths’ voice continues to soar on a new Glass Pear EP. The opener, “Where is My Home,” recalls Richard Ashcroft’s dramatic pacing while Griffiths’ range turns the acoustic “Loveable” from a bitter sweet breakup to something a little creepier. Strings add a touch of grace to “Say It Once” and drummer Tasha Baylis’ military-style brush strokes expertly marshals the swelling crescendo of guitars and piano on “No Reason to Love.”

Lyrically, Griffiths sings of personal, and perhaps, spiritual surrender, which is made all the more sweet by compositions beautifully rooted by his band in folk and even classical music. Glass Pear seems destined one day to make an album with a philharmonic accompaniment. Or maybe Griffiths could recruit a Welsh male voice choir.

Either way, for the softer side of indie rock, Glass Pear is quickly becoming the go-to band. But, don’t dismiss them as being edgeless: the stunning closer “Morning Light” features the kind of edgy chord progressions that sounds like a lost track from “OK Computer,” just without the feedback.

Erik Deatherage, WTMD Radio



Glass Pear, AKA Welsh singer/songwriter Yestyn Griffiths, first came on our radar last year with the release of his nicely crafted debut album Streets of Love. Then came the holiday released single “Until The Morning Come”, a lovely duet performed with Griffiths’ older sister Jem, the platinum-selling popster who obviously knows her way around a sweetly turned out melody (listen at DC here). “A lot of the songs I write are about the fragility and transiency of life and love,” says Griffiths. “So I wanted to find a name that expressed that.” And true to that moniker, Glass Pear songs reflect that sensitivity to the “breakable” nature of love, charming — if not exactly challenging — works that most often possess a soft, candied center and a light touch.

Newly released eight-song EP Sweet America continues Griffiths’ calmly studied folk/pop, smoothing any rough edges or troubling intensity with a soothing lyrical disposition and velvety production. “Morning Light” is an opulent spread of a song, drifting perilously close to gooey treacle but redeemed with clear-eyed emotional sincerity. We like the brushed-snare impetus that drives “No Reason To Love”, a track that floats along effortlessly buoyed by Griffiths’ soaring falsetto and chiming guitars, as well as the delectable title track that matches its orchestrated lament with some gorgeously hymnal melodic lines. Sweet America is available directly from the Glass Pear site or pick it up digitally at your favorite digital store.

Direct Current Music

Edited by Emoniummusic on 17 Jul 2010, 13:52

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