• my library

    18 Apr 2011, 18:20 by ce84

    • artist13th Floor ElevatorsalbumThe Psychedelic Sounds Of The 13th Floor Elevatorsartist13th Floor ElevatorsalbumEaster EverywhereartistAcid Mothers Temple & The Cosmic InfernoalbumAnthem Of The SpaceartistAcid Mothers Temple & The Melting Paraiso U.F.O.albumElectric HeavylandartistAcrimonyalbumTumuli ShroomaroomartistAC/DCalbumLet There Be RockartistAC/DCalbumHighway To HellartistAC/DCalbumBack In BlackartistAerosmithalbumToys In The AtticartistAfghan WhigsalbumGentlemenartistAfghan Whigsalbum1965artistAfrican Head ChargealbumMy Life In A Hole In The GroundartistAfro Celt Sound SystemalbumVolume 3: Further In TimeartistAgitation…
  • Songs covered by Mark Lanegan.

    16 Aug 2009, 01:35 by fecaparelli

  • At home with Nick Drake

    17 Jan 2009, 22:34 by farmolio

    I was lucky enough to find a copy of Nick Drake's Family Tree LP while looking through some record shops in Baltimore this week. It's a heart-rending set of songs, a few of which I'd heard before. They're all home recordings of some sort, either recorded by Nick himself or by friends of his. Nick is, of course, really a wonderful singer and guitarist, but the attraction of this set is the intimate nature of the recordings. You get to hear him laugh at his own surreal lyrics to Strange Meeting II, or at his flubbed fingerpicking at one moment during Day Is Done. And I can't help but wonder what ghastly and beautiful piano he's playing during a haunting performance of Way to Blue.

    There's more, too. There are songs by his mother, some with her singing, and a duet with his sister. There are covers of Bob Dylan, Dave Van Ronk, Bert Jansch, and Mozart. And I had no idea that Nick played the clarinet.

    I hate to sound like a complainer, but it's maybe too much, in the end. …
  • 50 Questions about my Top 50

    28 Sep 2008, 11:35 by Meatbreak

    1.How did you get into 29? (Chuck Berry)
    On the radio, on tv, in films, in my record collection; Chuck’s always been there from day one.

    2. What was the first song you ever heard by 22? (Le Loup)
    Canto I – the first song on the album The Throne Of The Third Heaven Of The Nations' Millennium General Assembly. I tend to hear most stuff once I’ve got it rather than listen to a song first.

    3. What's your favorite lyric by 33? (Secret Chiefs 3)
    Holy Vehm’s ‘Exterminating Angel’ from Book of Horizons: “Stand Up / Why do you think that you live? / Stand Up / Or rot there you motherfucking worm”….I think that’s what they say. It’s more the delivery than the lyrics as such. Death/black/thrash metal at the end of an pan-global-neo-classical opus.

    4. How did you get into 49? (Para One)
    Detournament or It Came From the Sea probably, can’t remember which one. Steve Chaos or Kicking K.

    5. How many albums by 13 do you own? (Wovenhand)
  • Phil Ochs

    17 Oct 2007, 23:52 by thevoid999

    Philip David Ochs was born December 19, 1940, in El Paso, Texas. Ochs was a “topical” singer, guitarist and songwriter, who first garnered attention in New York’s Greenwich Village. Fellow folk singer Dave Van Ronk commented that “as a lyricist, there was nobody like Phil before and there has not been anybody since…he had a touch that was so distinctive that it just could not be anybody else. He had been a journalism student before he became a singer, and he would never sacrifice what he felt to be the truth for a good line.” Folk singer and activist Pete Seeger wrote Phil a note in 1963 that said “I wish I had one tenth your talent as a songwriter.” An early opponent of the Vietnam War, Ochs took part in numerous anti-war protests and demonstrations. In 1964, Bob Dylan commented in Broadside magazine that “I just can’t keep up with Phil. And he’s getting better and better and better.” Ochs eventually recorded a total of eight albums for Elektra and A&M Records. …
  • Phil Ochs: The Ultimate Broadside Balladeer of the Civil Rights & Vietnam War Era

    1 Oct 2007, 01:13 by broadsideballad

    Broadside Balladeers Group Post #1 - Sept 30, 2007
    A note and a re-publishing of a 1982 article by this group's founder, Vic Sadot

    I loved those issues of Broadside Magazine that had provocative new political songs that you could learn and pass on to others. Phil Ochs and Malvina Reynolds must have each had over 70 songs in Broadside. Sis Cunningham and Gordon Friesen, who had come from Oklahoma to New York City with Woody Guthrie, published the little "rag" out of their apartment. In fact Sis played accordion and sang in a group that pre-dated the famous Weavers and included both Pete Seeger and Woody Guthrie. They were the Almanac Singers.

    In 1973 interviewed Phil Ochs on Washington, DC radio for WGTB, and I put him up in my apartment. It was terrific to get to know your hero. I once asked him if he had to label himself, what would that be? He said that he was a "democratic socialist". As a contemporary of Bob Dylan and Tom Paxton, and as a leader of that Greenwich Village 60's folk revival scene…
  • The Kossoy Sisters with Erik Darling - Bowling Green (1956)

    16 Sep 2007, 15:42 by L_T_B

    Het is 1953, de tweelingzusjes Irene en Ellen Kossoy vertoeven op een zomerkamp in de omgeving van New York. De zusjes zijn op dat moment pas 15 jaren jong, maar zijn al vanaf jonge tijd muzikaal actief. "Ever since we were able to talk, we were singing. Our mother’s sister lived with us and the two of them were always singing together in harmony, so we kind of figured that out fairly quickly when were about six or so". Het zomerkamp was niet ver verwijderd van het huis van Pete Seeger. En hij kwam dan ook regelmatig langs om de kinderen zijn muziek te laten horen en bracht dan een willekeur aan uiteenlopende artiesten met zich mee. Hierdoor raakte de beide zussen ook geïnteresseerd in de folk muziek. In vroegere jaren hadden ze met hun oudere zus al enkele hootenannies bezocht, maar de muziek van Pete Seeger bracht het besef naar boven dat ze zichzelf ook verder muzikaal wilden ontwikkelen. Ze werden, ondanks hun jeugdige leeftijd, frequente bezoekers van Washington Square in Greenwich Village. …
  • Attention Wilco Fans

    4 Sep 2007, 17:07 by Folkways

    Jeff Tweedy and Jay Bennet of the alternative country band Wilco recorded 3 live songs for the album The Harry Smith Connection: A Live Tribute, released by Smithsonian Folkways in 1998. The album was recently uploaded onto Last.FM so you can hear these artists going back to the roots which got them where they are today. Other artists on the compilation include: Ella Jenkins, Dave Van Ronk, even The Fugs, plus many more renowned musicians all paying tribute to Harry Smith's seminal Anthology of American Folk Music.
  • Attention Wilco Fans

    4 Sep 2007, 17:07 by Folkways

    Jeff Tweedy and Jay Bennet of the alternative country band Wilco recorded 3 live songs for the album The Harry Smith Connection: A Live Tribute, released by Smithsonian Folkways in 1998. The album was recently uploaded onto Last.FM so you can hear these artists going back to the roots which got them where they are today. Other artists on the compilation include: Ella Jenkins, Dave Van Ronk, even The Fugs, plus many more renowned musicians all paying tribute to Harry Smith's seminal Anthology of American Folk Music.
  • Attention Wilco Fans

    4 Sep 2007, 17:07 by Folkways

    Jeff Tweedy and Jay Bennet of the alternative country band Wilco recorded 3 live songs for the album The Harry Smith Connection: A Live Tribute, released by Smithsonian Folkways in 1998. The album was recently uploaded onto Last.FM so you can hear these artists going back to the roots which got them where they are today. Other artists on the compilation include: Ella Jenkins, Dave Van Ronk, even The Fugs, plus many more renowned musicians all paying tribute to Harry Smith's seminal Anthology of American Folk Music.