Butthole Surfers / Live Pcppep

Running length
18 tracks
Running time
54:04

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Tracklist

    Track     Duration Listeners
1 The Shah Sleeps in Lee Harvey's Grave 2:09 8,408
2 Hey 2:05 8,304
3 Something 4:35 9,882
4 Bar-B-Q Pope 3:35 6,552
5 Wichita Cathedral 2:22 5,768
6 Suicide 1:23 6,845
7 The Revenge of Anus Preseley 2:22 27
8 Cowboy Bob (Live) 2:31 2,471
9 Bar-B-Q Pope (Live) 3:08 1,123
10 Dance Of The Cobras (Live) 0:34 2,707
11 The Shah Sleeps In Lee Harvey's Grave (Live) 2:26 1,142
12 Wichita Cathedral (Live) 2:44 2,068
13 Hey (Live) 2:17 1,351
14 Something (Live) 7:38 1,081
15 Gary Floyd (live bonus track) 2:02 10
16 Matchstick (live bonus track) 3:09 12
17 Sinister Crayon (bonus track) 4:01 15
18 Something (Demo) 5:03 909

About this album

Butthole Surfers is the debut studio EP by American punk band Butthole Surfers, released in July 1983. It is also known as Brown Reason to Live and Pee Pee the Sailor (see “Title controversy”). All songs were written and produced by the Butthole Surfers.

The album was originally released on Alternative Tentacles. Butthole Surfers and 1984’s Live PCPPEP were reissued as the Butthole Surfers/Live PCPPEP CD on Latino Buggerveil in 2003. The 12-inch vinyl version is still available from Alternative Tentacles, and is listed as Brown Reason to Live.

The center label on Butthole Surfers’ vinyl printings invites listeners to erroneously play the record at “69 RPM,” a joke referencing the famous sex position. The album’s back cover features a mildly distorted image of famed Mexican luchador Santo.
Contents


* 1 Music
* 2 Title controversy
* 3 Background
* 4 Track listing
o 4.1 Side 1
o 4.2 Side 2
* 5 Personnel
* 6 References

Music

The Surfers introduced themselves to the world with seven songs full of throbbing bass, crashing drums, and heavily distorted guitar topped off with largely nonsensical, barely intelligible lyrics, alternately sung by lead vocalist Gibby Haynes and guitarist Paul Leary. Haynes also plays saxophone and eardrums on some tracks. Unlike later Surfers albums, no electronic instrumentation is present.

Some songs, such as “The Shah Sleeps in Lee Harvey’s Grave” and “Suicide,” appear to be either mockeries of, or sloppy attempts to mimic, the hardcore style of music that was rising in popularity amongst then-contemporary American punk fans.

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