• Will Money Ruin Everything?: Norway's Rune Grammofon

    22 May 2008, 09:10 by yagereales

    Will Money Ruin Everything?: Norway's Rune Grammofon

    Should you believe anyone-- especially anyone in the music business-- who insists that "money will ruin everything"? That's the titular warning of record label Rune Grammofon’s latest anthology, a celebration of its first 30 releases. The label even put that claim on a T-shirt. And when I asked Rune Grammofon boss Rune Kristoffersen what he would do if his label ever had a runaway hit, he laughs. "I'd rather not think about it!” he says. “I actually don't know actually. I’m not thinking in those terms at all."

    Kristoffersen operates his label out of Oslo, Norway, running it almost as a side project on top of his day job. Since 1998, his catalog has drawn from the experimental wing of Norway's music scene, which is gaining worldwide attention for its confluence of talents-- rock musicians playing austere improv, jazzbos programming electronics, laptop artists remixing contemporary composers. …
  • Not a journal entry about 100000 tracks being played

    21 Oct 2007, 23:57 by cartbot

    I just passed 100000 tracks played on last.fm today, and I thought it might be cool to start writing journals regularly again. I've been acquiring new music at a fairly rapid rate lately (while trying not to spend too much on any single CD... spending most of your time looking through the clearance bins rather than regular-priced stuff helps with this I guess) and I'm getting excited about the annual "World's Largest Garage Sale", which is coming up in one or two weeks now. I always pick up a lot of good CDs there. Anyway, here are the new albums I got this week:

    Sole — Learning to Walk
    Got this one from the (formerly?) CD-trading site lala. Not really an album, but a compilation of old tracks from 1995 to 1998. I used to have a different CD by Sole, I think it was Mansbestfriend Part 2 or something like that. Unlike this CD that one was self-produced, and I really just couldn't handle the ultra-lo-fi sound quality. The tracks on Learning to Walk are produced by several…
  • Tasankokaiku

    4 Dec 2006, 08:05 by othiym23

    It's hard to go wrong with the combination of Philip Glass and , but even so, with Tasankokaiku, Shogun Kunitoki have managed to put together an album of shimmering minimalism that doesn't even come close to failing. There are few elements to the group's sound that would have been difficult to realize even as long as 40 years ago, but the way they combine organ, chimes, and other bright, sparkling tones would be fresh whenever it was heard. There's something of the Nordic spareness of Arne Nordheim here, as well as the sunny faith of fellow Finn Einojuhani Rautavaara, even if Shogun Kunitoki come by their sound more via artists like Tangerine Dream or even the pulse of Neu!.

    This is one of the rare albums that might appeal to adventurous fans of classical music or the 20th century avant garde (particularly fans of Glass, John Adams or Steve Reich) as much as fans of indie music or . It is beautiful, compulsive listening, and it does not even close to overstaying its welcome. …