Biography

Äl Jawala [æl dʒa’væla], Arabic for “the traveler”, “The Wanderer”, “Mobile People” is a quintet from Freiburg, whose music style moves between Balkan-soul and Dance-beat.

Äl Jawala formed in summer 2000 as a quartet. They started their career on the streets and soon they released their first, hand copied 4-track EP Worldbeat. After streetmusic tours all over Europe, Äl Jawala released their debut album Urbannâtya in 2002. What still was stylistically hard to determine in the early stages, solidified itself during this period and created a new sound. This was followed by their first live album Balkan Big Beatz (2003).

In 2004 bassist Daniel Verdier joined the band. In 2005 Äl Jawala got awarded with the Kulturpreis of their hometown Emmendingen and their track A heymischer Bulgar appeared on the Gypsy Garden compilation. Shortly after Äl Jawala recorded Live At Jazzhaus - the first album presenting the new instrumentation. Also in 2005 Äl Jawala traveled to Romania for the first time where their musical roots can be found. After their concert at Stufstock Festival at the Black Sea, Äl Jawala became better known in Romania as innovators and re-importers of traditional Balkan music and an alternative to the beloved and hated Manele-Pop. Today they share festival stages with bands like Fanfare Ciocarlia, Emir Kusturica, Mahala Rai Banda, Paco de Lucia or Mariza.

In 2007 Äl Jawala got the Creole-Award for Worldmusic from Germany. The third live album Lost in Manele was released in summer 2007. In May 2009 they released their first studio album Asphalt Pirate Radio.

The Drums & Percussion magazine writes: “Challenging, fiery, fascinating, cosmopolitan, technically exciting but still accessible without digression. An absolutely emotive band that certainly can bring every crowd to a boil.”

In May 2007 Äl Jawala won the Creole Award for World Music from Germany. Besides the award of the internationally staffed jury, they also won the audience award of the festival.

Äl Jawala transmit the groove and sparkling vitality of Balkan music to the rhythms of modern urban club culture. Oriental Roma music meets deep funkiness and traditional Balkan tunes melt into and . Äl Jawala’s audience is diverse like their music – not knowing any cultural or age limits.

Edited by klimaz on 7 May 2011, 13:02

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Formed in
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