What albums are you listening to this week? And like, why?

 
    • nkh said...
    • User
    • 3 May 2008, 20:46
    nkh said:
    I'm listening to This is The Wind That Blows it Out, and Against Which The Sea Continually Beats, both by Glenn Jones. The reason being that I love solo acoustic guitar works, and his are very good.

    illbeintheair said:
    have you ever heard Jack Rose's stuff?

    Indeed I have, I tried to get hold of the LP version of his self titled record a few months back when Tequila Sunrise put out a really sweet, deluxe quality version. Alas, it sold out too quickly. I just ordered a double-album of his, along with some Glenn Jones a few days back though... so all is not lost.

  • Farmers Market - Surfin' USSR (2008)



    Highly technical Norwegian avant-jazz fused with Bulgarian folk and many other influences. It's pretty funny experimental shit. Recommended if you're into ipecac records stuff in general.

    • knkwzrd said...
    • User
    • 4 May 2008, 06:35
    I've been listening to that one for a few weeks now after it caught my eye at the bottom of Waffles.fm top 10.

  • I'm gonna try to get through Peter Brötzmann's Machine Gun, an album I randomly found (literally, hit random article on wikipedia). Maybe beelz can explain why this album is so highly regarded, I got through one track when I tried to listen earlier.

    • knkwzrd said...
    • User
    • 4 May 2008, 19:53
    Machine Gun is a lot more about the energy and intensity of the playing than it is about melody or harmony or any other traditional thing about music. Machine Gun is outstanding because every member of the octet plays so well and so intensely without exception. It's like the cover of the album says, "automatic gun for fast, continuous firing". It's something you have to be in a certain mood to appreciate, but when that mood strikes it rips you apart.

  • I definitely saw the connection between the cover and the music. I'll try to look at it from a different perspective, traditionally I would just rather listen to each of the eight playing well individually. Only problem is I've never heard anything like it, so I don't know what mood I have to be in...

  • Haarry said:
    Phibrizoq said:
    SeaHan escribió:
    Violent Femme's self-titled debut. The production is amazing, and I just can't get enough of it right now. So many good tracks on it.


    Agree. "Gone Daddy Gone" and "Add It Up" are totally awesome.


    Gordon Gano told me I was weird.


    He's been known as a master of the obvious.

    jazzoetry is poetry--last poets
    In my writing I am acting as a map maker, an explorer of psychic areas, a cosmonaut of inner space, and I see no point in exploring areas that have already been thoroughly surveyed--William S. Burroughs
  • MarioParty3 said:
    I'm gonna try to get through Peter Brötzmann's Machine Gun, an album I randomly found (literally, hit random article on wikipedia). Maybe beelz can explain why this album is so highly regarded, I got through one track when I tried to listen earlier.


    Nah, I'm afraid I can't explain it. I had heard Brötzmann with Last Exit before seeing him live with Die Like A Dog Quartet. I saw him two nights, both sets each night (William Parker and Hamid Drake were the draw for me) and I went away shaking my head, thinking this was a case of the emperor's new speedo.

    But then , a few years later, I picked up a Don Cherry - Brötzmann set and No Material with Ginger Baker & Brötzmann and then the Complete Machine Gun Sessions as well as Nipples and More Nipples.

    I love them. I think my initial problem was that I thought he was a living example of what many dismiss the free jazz elite as: talentless charlatans who can just blow, but not play. When I saw him live, he exhibited no nuance, just on-at-full-speed or off.

    Machine Gun is a sonic blast. While I know some folks who use Coltrane's Ascension to calm down & cool off, I've got to be pretty edgy already to listen to Machine Gun. But not too edgy or it all becomes like sandpaper.

    You might tune up by listening to Globe Unity Orchestra or Alexander von Schlippenbach's Pakistani Pomade first.

    But yeah, I think I was expecting force with some unifying theme, as in the Ohnedaruth track on the Art Ensemble of Chicago's Phase One. But again, I don't think I can explain it, b/c it's only been in the last two years that I've listened to it without trepidation.

    jazzoetry is poetry--last poets
    In my writing I am acting as a map maker, an explorer of psychic areas, a cosmonaut of inner space, and I see no point in exploring areas that have already been thoroughly surveyed--William S. Burroughs
  • Regarding Machine Gun, I'd say it was one of the (if not *the*) first jazz records that introduced me to the "non-figurative" side of jazz -and music, in a wider context-, with all the fiery playing and uncomfortable fauvist attitude. I find it funny how so many music fans like, say, a good horror movie and then dislike records like Machine Gun. Should good music equal beautifulness and structures?

    Not one of my very favorite jazz albums, but yeah, great record.

  • Been listening to the two albums by elvis costello that everyone has, and throwin in some of "kind of blue" by miles davis when im in the mood.

  • John Handy Live at the Monterey Jazz Festival. Why? John Handy's alto makes me shout for joy and weep with sadness, all in the span of twenty minutes or so. Michael White's violin expanded the vocabulary of the instrument in jazz so much that it wasn't funny. Handy has never gained the acclaim of many other post-Bird altoists, but on this day, in Monterey, California, in 1965, the muses came together and provided a (longer than 5 minutes) serenade.

    Plus...if you can get a good look at the artwork on the cover, Handy is wearing what looks like a fur Bishop's mitre. How cool is that?

    jazzoetry is poetry--last poets
    In my writing I am acting as a map maker, an explorer of psychic areas, a cosmonaut of inner space, and I see no point in exploring areas that have already been thoroughly surveyed--William S. Burroughs
  • Alice Coltrane - Journey in Satchidananda



    Incredibly beautiful album. It keeps growing on me. Also, I want to learn to play the harp. Joanna Newsom made me want to do so, but I thought it was just because I enjoyed her music a lot. After listening to Mrs. Coltrane, I've confirmed that I truly love that instrument.

  • Michael Moore - Lindsay Horner - Michael Vatcher

    Jewels & Binoculars: The Music of Bob Dylan



    A quiet, acoustic trio (clarinets, contrabass, & percussion) interpreting the songs of Bobby Zimmerman.

    Haunting. Ethereal. Live.

    jazzoetry is poetry--last poets
    In my writing I am acting as a map maker, an explorer of psychic areas, a cosmonaut of inner space, and I see no point in exploring areas that have already been thoroughly surveyed--William S. Burroughs
  • Gonna listen to Scarlett Johansson's Anywhere I Lay My Head first thing tomorrow, cos I'm intrigued as to how she summoned the gumption to do this...did Tom Waits have a say in it?


    • [Deleted user] said...
    • User
    • 19 May 2008, 22:32
    beelzbubba said:
    Michael Moore - Lindsay Horner - Michael Vatcher

    Jewels & Binoculars: The Music of Bob Dylan




    He plays the clarinet??

  • The Replacements-Tim

    because why wouldn't I be.

  • CarsCat said:
    beelzbubba said:
    Michael Moore - Lindsay Horner - Michael Vatcher

    Jewels & Binoculars: The Music of Bob Dylan




    He plays the clarinet??


    Heh. The guy in front is the American-born Dutch ex-pat who plays reeds in his own group, as well as ICP Orchestra(got any Juggalo pics? It's the Instant Composers Pool, not the scary clowns), Available Jelly, and the Clusone 3.

    jazzoetry is poetry--last poets
    In my writing I am acting as a map maker, an explorer of psychic areas, a cosmonaut of inner space, and I see no point in exploring areas that have already been thoroughly surveyed--William S. Burroughs
    • nkh said...
    • User
    • 20 May 2008, 09:44
    generalmalaise said:
    Gonna listen to Scarlett Johansson's Anywhere I Lay My Head first thing tomorrow, cos I'm intrigued as to how she summoned the gumption to do this...did Tom Waits have a say in it?

    Ah! I need to check thing out too, the curiosity is too much! I have no idea how, why and when the project started. The strange this is, I first caught wind of this a few weeks back when I had BBC6 on quietly in the background... I remember there was something playing and I thought to myself "pretty standard post-rock by the sounds of it, I wonder who this is?".

    After the song had ended the presenter started talking about Scarlett Johansson's record, Tom Waits covers etc. I'm still unsure if what I heard was from the record, we shall see.

  • Desert Island Dicks - Bring Me the Head of Miles Davis and Other Jazz Luminaries

    I'm curious as to how an album where the tracklisting is the same as Bitches Brew, Kind of Blue and Sketches of Spain but with all the tracks at 1:30 is gonna sound. It could either be total win or total fail, but probably the latter.

    Might pop on a few King Crimson bootlegs I've been collecting too.

  • Inner Space - The Lost Film Music Of Sven Libaek

    I liked the look of the cover. It's kind of light, jazzy, Life Aquatic-type stuff. Not elevator music, but definitely hotel lobby music.


    • Haarry said...
    • User
    • 21 May 2008, 12:01


    I like Jungle..

    No-one seems to give a shit about it though, it's really hard to find.

  • Ok, this is more like it. This time I really liked the look of the cover. The blurb says it better than I could: "18 real gone rockabilly blasters about sex, frogs, Martians, lust, fightin' and sex."


    • nkh said...
    • User
    • 21 May 2008, 13:43


    • Hot Snakes - Audit in Progress
    • Rocket From The Crypt - Group Sounds
    • The Night Marchers - See You in Magic
    • Hot Snakes - Automatic Midnight
    • Dananananaykroyd - Sissy Hits (EP)

    The above albums shall be the staple of my 'back to basics' week. I've missed this stuff, so much. It's not a suprise that John Reis is involved with four of those five records. You have to love that guy.





  • Warren Zevon almost single-handedly restores my faith in singer-songwriters.

  • Two must listens today: Carla Bley Tropic Appetites

    Progressive yet uncompromizing jazz. Great solos from Gato Barbieri and Bley. Amazing interplay between Dave Holland and Pauo Motion. Paul Haines writes great lyrics to Bleys tunes. I'm pretty sure that a few people besides Danielle (and me) listen to Emily Haines. She comes by it honestly.


    and Richard Thompson 1000 Years of Popular Music.

    How can you not swoon for the man who traverses the pop song from 1068 to 2000, from madrigals to Squeeze, let alone the awesome cover of Oops! I Did it Again. An oh yeah, Thompson kills on guitar.

    jazzoetry is poetry--last poets
    In my writing I am acting as a map maker, an explorer of psychic areas, a cosmonaut of inner space, and I see no point in exploring areas that have already been thoroughly surveyed--William S. Burroughs
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