Things that bother us.

 
    • [Deleted user] said...
    • User
    • 12 Dec 2007, 03:46
    tmills said:
    Soooo... don't leave us in suspense. You're definitely going to take that job, right!?


    Of course! Who needs an air-conditioned office when I can be on my feet for twelve hours a day making sure french fries are the right consistency?

    • tmills said...
    • User
    • 12 Dec 2007, 03:49
    I want that job :(

  • tmills said:
    findingthebomb bothers me.



    me too!

    and we are the two most powerful people in the group...

  • It was like 80 degrees here today. Fuck that. It's December. Act yo' season!

    • knkwzrd said...
    • User
    • 12 Dec 2007, 04:31
    It was -35° C here today, with a windchill on top of that.

    • tmills said...
    • User
    • 12 Dec 2007, 05:22
    I'll take the 80 degrees.

  • 40-50 would be nice.

    • [Deleted user] said...
    • User
    • 12 Dec 2007, 06:21
    I want to live in a place where it's 67 degrees 365 days a year.

  • Pillars1999 said:
    I want to live in a place where it's 67 degrees 365 days a year.


    I want that 345 days I've decided.

    10 in the breezy 40s-50s with crunchy maple leaves on the ground where everything is orange and red.

    And 10 with snow. Separate days though because the way the world sounds and smells right before it snows is magnificent. They need to be spread around.

    I love playing the "in a perfect world game".

    love, music, wine and revolution
  • Really guys? The weather? What are we...strangers on an elevator?

  • One thing that really bothered me about working in an office was precisely those meaningless elevator conversations, which the instigator would adapt according to which day of the week it was. To wit: "Tuesdays eh? I hate Tuesdays. Aren't Tuesdays the worst?" When actually, by default, every day spent in that office was a perfect vision of hell.

    • Haarry said...
    • User
    • 14 Dec 2007, 09:11
    I can feel the sexual tension in elevators.. love it.

  • generalmalaise said:
    One thing that really bothered me about working in an office was precisely those meaningless elevator conversations, which the instigator would adapt according to which day of the week it was. To wit: "Tuesdays eh? I hate Tuesdays. Aren't Tuesdays the worst?" When actually, by default, every day spent in that office was a perfect vision of hell.



    you would be a good character in a book

  • You really hate me now, don't you?

  • generalmalaise said:
    You really hate me now, don't you?


    I don't hate you, quite the contrary, you just sound like a c-character in a Hubert Selby Jr. novel, which I guess is a good thing because he is my favorite.

  • A c-character? I can't believe I listened to Billy Ocean for you.

    • [Deleted user] said...
    • User
    • 14 Dec 2007, 14:58
    Nobody puts Mr. Ocean in a corner!

  • Pillars1999 said:

    A few weeks ago, I talked to a recruiter from a food processing company and set up an interview for what I thought was a finance-related position.

    So yesterday, I drove 45 minutes into the middle of nowhere during the worst snowstorm of the year and almost slid off the road a few times. When I got to the interview, they explained to me that if I wanted a financial position with the company that I would have to work on the assembly line as a team leader for at least three to five years first. They then proceeded to show me a tour of the facilities. I got to see the entire process of a raw potato turning into a frozen french fry.


    A comment, then a question.

    Comment: Although I think the company went about it the wrong way, I can agree with their intentions. In the automotive component business I was in, we had far too many managers making decisions who had no concrete idea of what our products were or how they were made (that included me), which often led to attempting to do the impossible and charging far too little (or too much) to get it done.

    When I thoroughly pissed off my president & VP, they sent me to the plant in order to turn around some troubled product lines for key customers. I worked, ate & lived with the line workers for 3 months (not that this was my first taste of factory life--during my 20s I supported myself with several long-term manufacturing/assembly jobs) and gained a much better understanding of the business than most of my peers, resulting in a series of huge promotions despite the fact that the president & I still hated each other.

    That said, there is no productive reason to start a finance (or any other "white collar" if we still use that word) specialist as a team leader. Take it a step further--you were right to question their ethics in insisting on that formula. So let's presume that your financial analysis skills are of a caliber that you want to be doing that instead of supervising a potato gun line. So their hires are going to be people with lower finance skills who believe that this path will lock them in to something good. The potential for turnover is high, the potential for alienation in the line workers is high (unless they also have the opportunity to move up to finance/management through skills gained on the line). The only time this scenario makes good sense is when the children of a family owned company who will one day run it are hired on. To help them understand the business qua business and employees as people as opposed to feeling entitled to use the company as a personal asset, being grounded in all aspects of the company provides invaluable training. But to insist that college recruit hires start there is asinine. They should instead offer some sort of rotation where you begin your finance job, but at some point before serious promotion, make it optional to take an in-plant internship. Those with intentions to further their food-industry or materials processing careers will understand the opportunity and take it.

    Now the question--was it one of those processors that use the potato guns to fire out perfectly formed fries out of their insanely huge GMO potatoes? I'd love to see that!

    jazzoetry is poetry--last poets
    In my writing I am acting as a map maker, an explorer of psychic areas, a cosmonaut of inner space, and I see no point in exploring areas that have already been thoroughly surveyed--William S. Burroughs
    • [Deleted user] said...
    • User
    • 14 Dec 2007, 17:01
    I actually think it wouldn't be a bad idea for their new hires to go through some sort of training program where maybe they worked on the assembly line for a few weeks to get an idea of how things work. The whole idea that you have to work on the line for at least three to five years is ridiculous, though. Even at that point, a finance position isn't guaranteed.

    I've done very well in all of my finance courses in college, and have been on the Dean's list every semester since switching my focus to finance. However, I don't have a lot of on-the-job experience in finance. I hope to get into a branch manager trainee program with CitiFinancial or one of the other companies I'm interviewing with. That way I'll be able to recieve on-the-job training for a year or two, and then hopefully move into managing my own branch.

    And to answer your question, they did use potato guns to slice the potatoes into fries. They also used a process where they inject some sort of solution under the potato's skin to remove it. The entire process actually was kind of interesting, but factory work just isn't my cup of tea. Although with the economy the way it is and the problems financial institutions are facing due to the mortgage crisis, maybe I'm foolish for ruling out any job.

  • We need LJ cuts.

  • My trunk won't close. I got rear-ended this morning and I opened my trunk to put all my crap in there because I am supposed to drive to Chicago.

    Who knows when the fuck I will get there. I waiting on my friend to help me ghetto rig it soon.

    love, music, wine and revolution
  • Random annoyance...

    How some people have two last names, separated by a hyphen. Just pick one or the other, damnit!

    Someday the dream will end
    • [Deleted user] said...
    • User
    • 11 Jan 2008, 01:36
    pavskies said:
    Random annoyance...

    How some people have two last names, separated by a hyphen. Just pick one or the other, damnit!


    That's one conflict I'm going to have when (and if) I get married, since I want to keep my last name—I can't imagine being called by a different one. Whose name will my future kids take?

  • My AP Euro Class, who for some reason don't think Napoleon was the baddest most awesome motherfucker who ever set foot on the earth, and think hes an evil tyrant DICKS!

  • CarsCat said:
    pavskies said:
    Random annoyance...

    How some people have two last names, separated by a hyphen. Just pick one or the other, damnit!


    That's one conflict I'm going to have when (and if) I get married, since I want to keep my last name—I can't imagine being called by a different one. Whose name will my future kids take?

    Their father's, but yours would typically be their middle name. I think that only applies to your first child, though.

    That was then, this is dumb.
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