The Jazz Desk:

 
  • 25 Great Black Freedom Jazz Albums

    Abdullah Ibrahim - African Space Program (1974)
    Albert Ayler - Spirits Rejoice (1964)
    Archie Shepp - Magic of Juju (1967)
    Art Ensemble of Chicago - Bap-Tizum
    Eddie Gale - Eddie Gale's Ghetto Music (1968)
    Human Arts Ensemble - Under The Sun
    James "Blood" Ulmer - Odyssey (1983)
    Joe McPhee - Nation Time
    Julius Hemphill - Dogon A.D.
    McCoy Tyner - Extensions
    Normon Connors - Dance of Magic
    Pharoah Sanders - Black Unity (1971)
    Sonny Simmons - Music from the Spheres (1966)





    count = 13

    jazzoetry is poetry--last poets
    In my writing I am acting as a map maker, an explorer of psychic areas, a cosmonaut of inner space, and I see no point in exploring areas that have already been thoroughly surveyed--William S. Burroughs
  • Re: 25 Great Black Freedom Jazz Albums

    Abdullah Ibrahim - African Space Program (1974)
    Albert Ayler - Spirits Rejoice (1964)
    Archie Shepp - Magic of Juju (1967)
    Art Ensemble of Chicago - Bap-Tizum
    Don Cherry - Complete Communion (1965)
    Eddie Gale - Eddie Gale's Ghetto Music (1968)
    Human Arts Ensemble - Under The Sun
    James "Blood" Ulmer - Odyssey (1983)
    Joe McPhee - Nation Time
    Julius Hemphill - Dogon A.D.
    McCoy Tyner - Extensions
    Mtume & the Umoja Ensemble - Alkebu-lan (Land of the Blacks)(1972)
    Normon Connors - Dance of Magic
    Pharoah Sanders - Black Unity (1971)
    Sonny Simmons - Music from the Spheres (1966)





    count = 15

    jazzoetry is poetry--last poets
    In my writing I am acting as a map maker, an explorer of psychic areas, a cosmonaut of inner space, and I see no point in exploring areas that have already been thoroughly surveyed--William S. Burroughs
  • Re: Re: 25 Great Black Freedom Jazz Albums

    beelzbubba said:


    Abdullah Ibrahim - African Space Program (1974)
    Albert Ayler - Spirits Rejoice (1964)
    Archie Shepp - Magic of Juju (1967)
    Art Ensemble of Chicago - Bap-Tizum
    Billy Harper - Capra Black (1973)
    Don Cherry - Complete Communion (1965)
    Eddie Gale - Eddie Gale's Ghetto Music (1968)
    Frank Lowe - The Flam (1975)
    Human Arts Ensemble - Under The Sun
    Jackie McLean - Let Freedom Ring*
    James "Blood" Ulmer - Odyssey (1983)
    Joe McPhee - Nation Time
    Julius Hemphill - Dogon A.D.
    McCoy Tyner - Extensions
    Mtume & the Umoja Ensemble - Alkebu-lan (Land of the Blacks)(1972)
    Norman Connors - Dance of Magic
    Pharoah Sanders - Black Unity (1971)
    Sonny Simmons - Music from the Spheres (1966)





    count = 18


    A note on the Jackie McLean title. This is rooted far deeper in hard bop than any notion of free blowing, but along with One Step Beyond, Destination Out!, Right Now, and Old & New Gospel, McLean formed the bridge from bebop to the "new music" perhaps only behind Coltrane and Dolphy, and with his credentials earned at the side of Charlie "Yardbird" Parker, he provided validation for the emerging artists who populated and propagated American free jazz.

    I'm having fun filling out the list of 25, and welcome others ideas, but I will keep going if y'all don't stop me.

    jazzoetry is poetry--last poets
    In my writing I am acting as a map maker, an explorer of psychic areas, a cosmonaut of inner space, and I see no point in exploring areas that have already been thoroughly surveyed--William S. Burroughs
    Edited by beelzbubba on 24 Jan 2008, 16:37
    • cjcarne said...
    • User
    • 17 Jan 2008, 13:40
    Here's a couple of fairly obscure outings in a distinctly post-Ayler mode. I'd not listened to these for ages and had forgotten how good they are...

    Frank Wright Quartet - Church Number Nine (1973)
    Noah Howard - The Black Ark (1969)

    Chief Slacker & Bat Chain Puller At:
    Desk Supervisor: Free Improvisation Artist Expert: Derek Bailey, Pere Ubu
    And remember, you get a free dead cat in each bar of Dead Cat Soap

  • No Fela Kuti?? Or am I just misunderstanding this genre?

  • Re: Re: Re: 25 Great Black Freedom Jazz Albums

    Abdullah Ibrahim - African Space Program (1974)
    Albert Ayler - Spirits Rejoice (1964)
    Archie Shepp - Magic of Juju (1967)
    Art Ensemble of Chicago - Bap-Tizum
    Billy Harper - Capra Black (1973)
    Don Cherry - Complete Communion (1965)
    Eddie Gale - Eddie Gale's Ghetto Music (1968)
    Frank Lowe - The Flam (1975)
    Frank Wright Quartet - Church Number Nine (1973)

    Human Arts Ensemble - Under The Sun
    Jackie McLean - Let Freedom Ring
    James "Blood" Ulmer - Odyssey (1983)
    Joe McPhee - Nation Time
    Julius Hemphill - Dogon A.D.
    McCoy Tyner - Extensions
    Mtume & the Umoja Ensemble - Alkebu-lan (Land of the Blacks)(1972)
    Noah Howard - The Black Ark (1969)
    Norman Connors - Dance of Magic
    Pharoah Sanders - Black Unity (1971)
    Sonny Simmons - Music from the Spheres (1966)





    count = 20

    jazzoetry is poetry--last poets
    In my writing I am acting as a map maker, an explorer of psychic areas, a cosmonaut of inner space, and I see no point in exploring areas that have already been thoroughly surveyed--William S. Burroughs
  • matetoth said:
    No Fela Kuti?? Or am I just misunderstanding this genre?


    You know how this works, right? You copy the list, add your picks (blue or bold helps them stand out), year of release if you got it, add it to the count.

    As far as Fela fitting the list? Your choice. I don't think he's got the requisite improvisatory component. Johnny Diyani, Mongezi Feza, Dudu Pukwana, sure. Fela, afro-jazz, afro-pop, Nigerian Hi-Life. Definitely meets the black freedom perspective. So add it if you want it.

    jazzoetry is poetry--last poets
    In my writing I am acting as a map maker, an explorer of psychic areas, a cosmonaut of inner space, and I see no point in exploring areas that have already been thoroughly surveyed--William S. Burroughs
    • cjcarne said...
    • User
    • 18 Jan 2008, 17:02

    Re: Re: Re: Re: 25 Great Black Freedom Jazz Albums

    One more...

    Abdullah Ibrahim - African Space Program (1974)
    Albert Ayler - Spirits Rejoice (1964)
    Archie Shepp - Magic of Juju (1967)
    Art Ensemble of Chicago - Bap-Tizum
    Billy Harper - Capra Black (1973)
    Don Cherry - Complete Communion (1965)
    Eddie Gale - Eddie Gale's Ghetto Music (1968)
    Frank Lowe - The Flam (1975)
    Frank Wright Quartet - Church Number Nine (1973)
    Human Arts Ensemble - Under The Sun
    Jackie McLean - Let Freedom Ring
    James "Blood" Ulmer - Odyssey (1983)
    Joe McPhee - Nation Time
    Julius Hemphill - Dogon A.D.
    McCoy Tyner - Extensions
    Mtume & the Umoja Ensemble - Alkebu-lan (Land of the Blacks)(1972)
    Noah Howard - The Black Ark (1969)
    Norman Connors - Dance of Magic
    Pharoah Sanders - Black Unity (1971)
    Sonny Simmons - Music from the Spheres (1966)
    Sunny Murray - S/T (1966)





    count = 21

    Chief Slacker & Bat Chain Puller At:
    Desk Supervisor: Free Improvisation Artist Expert: Derek Bailey, Pere Ubu
    And remember, you get a free dead cat in each bar of Dead Cat Soap

  • Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: 25 Great Black Freedom Jazz Albums

    cjcarne said:
    One more...

    Abdullah Ibrahim - African Space Program (1974)
    Albert Ayler - Spirits Rejoice (1964)
    Archie Shepp - Magic of Juju (1967)
    Art Ensemble of Chicago - Bap-Tizum
    Billy Harper - Capra Black (1973)
    Clifford Thornton - Ketchaoua (1969)
    Don Cherry - Complete Communion (1965)
    Eddie Gale - Eddie Gale's Ghetto Music (1968)
    Frank Lowe - The Flam (1975)
    Frank Wright Quartet - Church Number Nine (1973)
    Grachan Moncur III - New Africa (1969)
    Human Arts Ensemble - Under The Sun
    Jackie McLean - Let Freedom Ring
    James "Blood" Ulmer - Odyssey (1983)
    Joe McPhee - Nation Time
    Julius Hemphill - Dogon A.D.
    McCoy Tyner - Extensions
    Mtume & the Umoja Ensemble - Alkebu-lan (Land of the Blacks)(1972)
    Noah Howard - The Black Ark (1969)
    Norman Connors - Dance of Magic
    Pharoah Sanders - Black Unity (1971)
    Sonny Simmons - Music from the Spheres (1966)
    Sunny Murray - S/T (1966)





    count = 23

    jazzoetry is poetry--last poets
    In my writing I am acting as a map maker, an explorer of psychic areas, a cosmonaut of inner space, and I see no point in exploring areas that have already been thoroughly surveyed--William S. Burroughs
    Edited by beelzbubba on 24 Jan 2008, 16:36
  • Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: 25 Great Black Freedom Jazz Albums

    Abdullah Ibrahim - African Space Program (1974)
    Albert Ayler - Spirits Rejoice (1964)
    Archie Shepp - Magic of Juju (1967)
    Art Ensemble of Chicago - Bap-Tizum
    Billy Harper - Capra Black (1973)
    Clifford Thornton - Ketchaoua (1969)
    Don Cherry - Complete Communion (1965)
    Eddie Gale - Eddie Gale's Ghetto Music (1968)
    Frank Lowe - The Flam (1975)
    Frank Wright Quartet - Church Number Nine (1973)
    Grachan Moncur III - New Africa (1969)
    Human Arts Ensemble - Under The Sun
    Jackie McLean - Let Freedom Ring
    James "Blood" Ulmer - Odyssey (1983)
    Joe McPhee - Nation Time
    Julius Hemphill - Dogon A.D.
    McCoy Tyner - Extensions
    Mtume & the Umoja Ensemble - Alkebu-lan (Land of the Blacks)(1972)
    Noah Howard - The Black Ark (1969)
    Norman Connors - Dance of Magic
    Pharoah Sanders - Black Unity (1971)
    Sonny Simmons - Music from the Spheres (1966)
    Sunny Murray - S/T (1966)





    count = 23


    jazzoetry is poetry--last poets
    In my writing I am acting as a map maker, an explorer of psychic areas, a cosmonaut of inner space, and I see no point in exploring areas that have already been thoroughly surveyed--William S. Burroughs
  • ..just two more albums to go.

    How about 25 Great Spiritual Jazz Albums as the next one?

  • Re: 25 Great Black Freedom Jazz Albums

    Abdullah Ibrahim - African Space Program (1974)
    Albert Ayler - Spirits Rejoice (1964)
    Archie Shepp - Magic of Juju (1967)
    Art Ensemble of Chicago - Bap-Tizum
    Billy Harper - Capra Black (1973)
    Carlos Garnett - Black Love (1974)
    Clifford Thornton - Ketchaoua (1969)
    Don Cherry - Complete Communion (1965)
    Eddie Gale - Eddie Gale's Ghetto Music (1968)
    Frank Lowe - The Flam (1975)
    Frank Wright Quartet - Church Number Nine (1973)
    George Russell - Electronic Sonata for Souls Loved By Nature (1968)
    Grachan Moncur III - New Africa (1969)
    Human Arts Ensemble - Under The Sun
    Jackie McLean - Let Freedom Ring
    James "Blood" Ulmer - Odyssey (1983)
    Joe McPhee - Nation Time
    Julius Hemphill - Dogon A.D.
    McCoy Tyner - Extensions
    Mtume & the Umoja Ensemble - Alkebu-lan (Land of the Blacks)(1972)
    Noah Howard - The Black Ark (1969)
    Norman Connors - Dance of Magic
    Pharoah Sanders - Black Unity (1971)
    Sonny Simmons - Music from the Spheres (1966)
    Sunny Murray - S/T (1966)



    count = 25


    Well, that's it, that's 25. Most of the selections came from me, and that's not a boast but perhaps a limitation. I consciously left out some genre-bending dates or some that had one foot more firmly in another camp (examples; Charles Mingus, Ornette Coleman, Sun Ra, Rahsaan Roland Kirk) and I also tried to keep entries to one per artist or I could have filled the entire list with Pharoah, Don Cherry, Clifford Thornton and Julius Hemphill. But I hope that if you pick up any of these, it might make you more curious about the rest.

    Beelz

    jazzoetry is poetry--last poets
    In my writing I am acting as a map maker, an explorer of psychic areas, a cosmonaut of inner space, and I see no point in exploring areas that have already been thoroughly surveyed--William S. Burroughs
  • The first album that striked me when the list was put up:

    Max Roach - We Insist! Max Roach's Freedom Now Suite (1961)

    Why did you skip this one? Was it not as good as the 25 albums above? or it's too structured to be in the list??

  • I struggled with adding Jackie McLean to the list despite the 5-star performances he put in on his 60's Blue Notes. Yes, too structured, not yet evincing the full-blown passion that would come with Shepp and Sanders et al.

    It would be on my list of close antecedents--music that was necessary before the other could follow, and, you know me, I wouldn't have objected at all if someone had put it on the list.

    jazzoetry is poetry--last poets
    In my writing I am acting as a map maker, an explorer of psychic areas, a cosmonaut of inner space, and I see no point in exploring areas that have already been thoroughly surveyed--William S. Burroughs
  • Who sounds like yoko kanno, but with lyrics in a language i speak?

  • hey, lets just get the Hard Bop list done.
    is Bobby Hutcherson - Dialogue (1965) hard Bop? I'm playing it now, i like this cd (i always felt all Frank Zappa's 'Jazz' came from BH).

    stab me 'til i cum
  • Based on several music guides, hard bop followed bop and is based on bop. Let's hear from AMG's Scott Yanow (a critic I often disagree with, but I gotta say he knows more about bop than I ever will):

    Although some history books claim that Hard Bop arose as a reaction to the softer sounds featured in cool jazz, it was actually an extension of bop that largely ignored West Coast jazz. The main differences between hard bop and bop are that the melodies tend to be simpler and often more "soulful"; the rhythm section is usually looser, with the bassist not as tightly confined to playing four-beats-to-the-bar as in bop; a gospel influence is felt in some of the music; and quite often, the saxophonists and pianists sound as if they were quite familiar with early rhythm & blues. Since the prime time period of hard bop (1955-70) was a decade later than bop, these differences were a logical evolution and one can think of hard bop as bop of the '50s and '60s. By the second half of the 1960s, the influence of the avant garde was being felt and some of the more adventurous performances of the hard bop stylists (such as Jackie McLean and Lee Morgan) fell somewhere between the two styles. With the rise of fusion and the sale of Blue Note (hard bop's top label) in the late '60s, the style fell on hard times although it was revived to a certain extent in the 1980s. Much of the music performed by the so-called Young Lions during the latter decade (due to other influences altering their style) was considered modern mainstream, although some groups (such as the Harper Brothers and T.S. Monk's sextet) have kept the 1960s' idiom alive. -- Scott Yanow

    So, yeah, Dialogue is hard-bop. And maybe Ruth Underwood's vibe playing is influenced by BH (more likely by earlier cats like Lionel hampton or Red Norvo since she's roughly contemporary with Hutcherson.

    For the record, FZ scoffed at the notion that he played anything that was jazz (I'm not sure I believe him completely), although many listeners "hear" jazz in Zappa. I hear complex rock&roll, but his bands almost always had people with jazz cred: Don Preston, the Underwoods, Bunk Gardner.

    Now, unless you want me to just fill up a list with my favorite Blue Notes from 1960-1970, y'all better pony up a few suggestions of your own.

    I'll wait until someone else starts...

    jazzoetry is poetry--last poets
    In my writing I am acting as a map maker, an explorer of psychic areas, a cosmonaut of inner space, and I see no point in exploring areas that have already been thoroughly surveyed--William S. Burroughs
  • posted on the Shoutbox desk..

    joshkouri said:
    I'm looking for something a little specific. I'm looking for some real mellow, solo piano jazz in the vein of Keith Jarret's "The Melody at Night, With You" and Bill Evan's "Alone" albums. I already have both and it makes incredible background music but I need some new recommendations! Both of the albums are on last.fm and can be sampled to get an idea of what I'm talking about. Thank you!


    I'm out of this list, hard bop is not my cup of tea.

  • 25 Great Hard Bop Albums

    astro1_rohit said:


    I'm out of this list, hard bop is not my cup of tea.


    I hope you'll sample some of the recommendations. I am not at all a bopper--the percentage of my listening that is 1946-1960 is miniscule, but hard-bop and post-bop both yield many treasures I can't do without. Maybe you'll find you like some of them. So, starting with mostly-metal's pick, let's get this one rolling and then pick back up with Rohit's request for Spiritual Jazz.

    I'm gonna be hard pressed to stick with one lp per artist, but I think that's the way it should be. To get around that, I'll just say that anyone who finds Dialogue in the least bit interesting NEEDS to listen to Bobby Hutcherson Stick-Up!.

    This genre is easy for me, so if you want to shut me up, start pickin'.

    Bobby Hutcherson - Dialogue
    Curtis Fuller - Boss of the Soul Stream Trombone
    Joe Henderson - Inner Urge
    Johnny Griffin - Blowin' Session


    That's my three for now, plus m-m's one.

    Count=4

    jazzoetry is poetry--last poets
    In my writing I am acting as a map maker, an explorer of psychic areas, a cosmonaut of inner space, and I see no point in exploring areas that have already been thoroughly surveyed--William S. Burroughs
  • astro1_rohit said:
    posted on the Shoutbox desk..

    joshkouri said:
    I'm looking for something a little specific. I'm looking for some real mellow, solo piano jazz in the vein of Keith Jarret's "The Melody at Night, With You" and Bill Evan's "Alone" albums. I already have both and it makes incredible background music but I need some new recommendations! Both of the albums are on last.fm and can be sampled to get an idea of what I'm talking about. Thank you!




    I'm loathe to recommend great trio albums as "background music" but in the hopes of removing some earwax & opening some eyes, herewith, riyl The Melody at Night with You and Alone...

    Paul Bley - Ramblin
    Paul Bley - Open To Love
    Jacky Terrasson - Reach
    Bill Evans - Waltz for Debby
    Chick Corea & Gary Burton - Crystal Silence
    Keith Jarrett - Facing You
    Stanley Cowell - Illusion Suite
    Cedar Walton - A Night at Boomer's Vol 1 & 2

    Something in there is gonna connect with you. Listen to a few, and tell me if you like them louder or softer than X.

    jazzoetry is poetry--last poets
    In my writing I am acting as a map maker, an explorer of psychic areas, a cosmonaut of inner space, and I see no point in exploring areas that have already been thoroughly surveyed--William S. Burroughs
  • Re: 25 Great Hard Bop Albums

    beelzbubba said:
    With the rise of fusion and the sale of Blue Note (hard bop's top label) in the late '60s, the style fell on hard times although it was revived to a certain extent in the 1980s. Much of the music performed by the so-called Young Lions during the latter decade (due to other influences altering their style) was considered modern mainstream, although some groups (such as the Harper Brothers and T.S. Monk's sextet) have kept the 1960s' idiom alive. -- Scott Yanow
    yo beelz, can u rec me some of the 60s-y 80s hard bop.

    astro1_rohit said:
    I'm out of this list, hard bop is not my cup of tea.
    beelzbubba said:I am not at all a bopperWhat what what?! i thought everyone listened to hard bop. i thought hard bop was IT. i thought anyone who said the liked other genres were just saying so. bloody hell.

    beelzbubba said:
    anyone who finds Dialogue in the least bit interesting NEEDS to listen to Bobby Hutcherson Stick-Up!.
    Hey, i prefer Stick Up!, it was just taht i was playing Dialogue at the time, i'd be more than happy to switch that.

    Bobby Hutcherson - Dialogue
    Elvin Jones/Jimmy Garrison Sextet - Illumination! (1964)
    Curtis Fuller - Boss of the Soul Stream Trombone
    Joe Henderson - Inner Urge
    Johnny Griffin - Blowin' Session

    List: 25 Great Hard Bop Albums, Count: 4


    hey everyone, id really like a helping hand with any of my additions, dont be afraid to tell me im way off - i dont really know what makes Hard Bop Hard Bop, but im almost certain thats the style i like.

    stab me 'til i cum
  • Re: 25 Great Hard Bop Albums

    beelzbubba said:
    With the rise of fusion and the sale of Blue Note (hard bop's top label) in the late '60s, the style fell on hard times although it was revived to a certain extent in the 1980s. Much of the music performed by the so-called Young Lions during the latter decade (due to other influences altering their style) was considered modern mainstream, although some groups (such as the Harper Brothers and T.S. Monk's sextet) have kept the 1960s' idiom alive. -- Scott Yanow
    yo beelz, can u rec me some of the 60s-y 80s hard bop.

    astro1_rohit said:
    I'm out of this list, hard bop is not my cup of tea.
    beelzbubba said:I am not at all a bopperWhat what what?! i thought everyone listened to hard bop. i thought hard bop was IT. i thought anyone who said the liked other genres were just saying so. bloody hell.

    beelzbubba said:
    anyone who finds Dialogue in the least bit interesting NEEDS to listen to Bobby Hutcherson Stick-Up!.
    Hey, i prefer Stick Up!, it was just taht i was playing Dialogue at the time, i'd be more than happy to switch that.

    Bobby Hutcherson - Dialogue
    Elvin Jones/Jimmy Garrison Sextet - Illumination! (1964)
    Curtis Fuller - Boss of the Soul Stream Trombone
    Joe Henderson - Inner Urge
    Johnny Griffin - Blowin' Session

    List: 25 Great Hard Bop Albums, Count: 4


    hey everyone, id really like a helping hand with any of my additions, dont be afraid to tell me im way off - i dont really know what makes Hard Bop Hard Bop, but im almost certain thats the style i like.

    stab me 'til i cum
  • Re: Re: 25 Great Hard Bop Albums

    mostly-metal said:
    yo beelz, can u rec me some of the 60s-y 80s hard bop.

    astro1_rohit said:
    I'm out of this list, hard bop is not my cup of tea.
    beelzbubba said:I am not at all a bopperWhat what what?! i thought everyone listened to hard bop. i thought hard bop was IT. i thought anyone who said the liked other genres were just saying so. bloody hell.


    I think you misunderstood me. I loooove hard-bop & post-bop. it is be-bop that I still have a hard time with. hard bop comes from bebop, but bebop is the earlier form. It may have started in the early 40s but came to prominence in the immediate post WWII era.

    Bebop is Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Kenny Clarke, Bud Powell, Max Roach. Charles Mingus comes out of bebop, but took things to the next level. Monk straddles the line--definitely started out bebop but played with such a distinctive style that he couldn't totally be pegged.

    Sometimes, all of these genres get abbreviated to "bop" and most of the hard boppers would tell you that they would be honored to be mentioned in the same breath
    as parker et al. And I get the brilliance of Parker--I'm not running down bebop, I've just never warmed to it. I dunno, too much playing in unison, too many 64th notes, something.

    But hard bop. Oh man. I love hard bop. So, here's 3 hard bop classics to add to the list.

    Bobby Hutcherson - Stick-Up!
    Charles Tolliver - The Ringer
    Elvin Jones/Jimmy Garrison Sextet - Illumination! (1964)
    Curtis Fuller - Boss of the Soul Stream Trombone
    Joe Henderson - Inner Urge
    Johnny Griffin - Blowin' Session
    Rahsaan Roland Kirk - Rip, Rig and Panic
    Walter Bishop Jr. - Coral Keys


    List: 25 Great Hard Bop Albums, Count: 8

    mostly-metalsaid: hey everyone, id really like a helping hand with any of my additions, dont be afraid to tell me im way off - i dont really know what makes Hard Bop Hard Bop, but im almost certain thats the style i like.

    Well, Scott Yanow says: The main differences between hard bop and bop are that the melodies tend to be simpler and often more "soulful"; the rhythm section is usually looser, with the bassist not as tightly confined to playing four-beats-to-the-bar as in bop; a gospel influence is felt in some of the music; and quite often, the saxophonists and pianists sound as if they were quite familiar with early rhythm & blues.

    Which means, in short, that after bebop, some of the cats that came up with/in bebop play "soul jazz" that's also called hard bop (Horace Silver, Lee Morgan), some add elements of modal jazz pioneers George Russell and Miles Davis (Herbie Hancock, Wayne Shorter).

    I'll say it again, this is an easy list to put up 25 different artists. The hard part is keeping it to ONLY 25 and picking among the great, great albums by McLean, Morgan, Hubbard, Tyner, Timmons, Blakey, and the rest.

    jazzoetry is poetry--last poets
    In my writing I am acting as a map maker, an explorer of psychic areas, a cosmonaut of inner space, and I see no point in exploring areas that have already been thoroughly surveyed--William S. Burroughs
  • oh.

    Art Blakey - Free for All (1964)
    Bobby Hutcherson - Stick-Up!
    Charles Mingus - Blues & Roots (1960)
    Charles Tolliver - The Ringer
    Elvin Jones/Jimmy Garrison Sextet - Illumination! (1964)
    Eric Dolphy - At the Five Spot, Vol. 2 (1964)
    Curtis Fuller - Boss of the Soul Stream Trombone
    Joe Henderson - Inner Urge
    Johnny Griffin - Blowin' Session
    Rahsaan Roland Kirk - Rip, Rig and Panic
    Sonny Clark - Sonny Clark Trio (1958)
    Walter Bishop Jr. - Coral Keys

    List: 25 Great Hard Bop Albums, Count: 12[/size=8]

    stab me 'til i cum
  • mostly-metal said:
    oh.

    Yeh. You got it now.

    Art Blakey - Free for All (1964)
    Bobby Hutcherson - Stick-Up! (1966)
    Charles Mingus - Blues & Roots (1960)
    Charles Tolliver - The Ringer (1969)
    Elvin Jones/Jimmy Garrison Sextet - Illumination! (1964)
    Eric Dolphy - At the Five Spot, Vol. 2 (1964)
    Curtis Fuller - Boss of the Soul Stream Trombone (1960)
    Jackie McLean - Destination Out! (1963)
    Joe Henderson - Inner Urge (1964)
    Johnny Griffin - A Blowin' Session (1957)
    Lee Morgan - Search for the New Land (1964)
    Rahsaan Roland Kirk - Rip, Rig and Panic (1965)
    Sonny Clark - Sonny Clark Trio (1958)
    Walter Bishop Jr. - Coral Keys (1972)
    Wayne Shorter - Speak No Evil (1965) (recording session was Christmas Eve, 1964)[/size=8]

    List: 25 Great Hard Bop Albums, Count: 15

    jazzoetry is poetry--last poets
    In my writing I am acting as a map maker, an explorer of psychic areas, a cosmonaut of inner space, and I see no point in exploring areas that have already been thoroughly surveyed--William S. Burroughs
Anonymous users may not post messages. Please log in or create an account to post in the forums.