Legalize it! - not gonna happen

 
    • [Deleted user] said...
    • User
    • 2 Sep 2009, 09:07

    Legalize it! - not gonna happen

    I just saw 'legalize it' posted in the shoutbox...

    THEY'RE NOT GONNA LEGALIZE IT.
    M.J. acts against their brainwashing techniques and makes the user see all of their propaganda more easily. Just switch on BBC, CBS, CNN or any other news channel, mute the sound, and observe for a while. Take a good look at how the information is presented.

    I dunno, you can say I'm just another nutcase, fine, but at least be honest with yourself - can you really trust the rulers of this world and take everything they say for granted?

    Why would they want to legalize something like that? No way that's ever happening with the current state of this planet...



    P.S. It's a shame so few people are going to read this.

  • Word.

  • This bbc man obviously had a good time whilst researching this story in Oaksterdam CA.
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/8275794.stm

    Just look at the nutjob he chose to interview to represent the forces opposed to legalisation.

    >>One of those opponents of the proposal is Ronald Brooks, the president of the National Narcotic Officers' Associations' Coalition, which represents more than 70,000 narcotics enforcement officers in the US.

    We meet in the town of Redwood City, south of San Francisco, and as I get in his car, we drive past what appears to be a nondescript office building.

    However, he tells me that, in the 1980s, it was a bank - the place where his partner on the police force was killed in front of him by a ruthless marijuana dealer, who was carrying out a bank robbery to fund his drug business. <<

    ...and now, some 20 years later, that same cop manages to shoot himself in the foot with that comment, which could have come straight from 'Reefer Madness' , in front of the same bank whilst talking to the bbc man.

    I am indeed rolling on the floor, laughing.

    alec.
  • They should. It would bring the US out of this depression.
    All they'd have to do is tax the shit out of it.

  • Let's not kid ourselves. While the Powers That Be may well be using what could be called "brainwashing" techniques, smoking weed doesn't do shit to counteract that. It doesn't open your eyes. It doesn't boost your critical thinking skills. It doesn't broaden your perceptions. It doesn't counteract the mind-control rays beaming out of the Washington monument, and it isn't the key to world peace.

    It just gets you high. That's it. It's just weed, not the magic sunglasses from They Live.

  • They do not legalized because there is that old dilemma that marijuana is the gateway to the destructive drugs like crack cocaine heroin etc ...
    We know that it is still really bad not everyone who smokes marijuana use other drugs and because of the bad reputation of these drugs lack of information and media marijuana negative we have to pay for the mistakes of others.
    But we must not stop fighting for legalization.
    Think how good it would go to a store near your home or like coffee shops in Amsterdam to buy marijuana ...
    Marijuana does not bother us, with legalization we would no longer buy marijuana in the hands of dangerous drug, not to mention that we had a pot of good quality.

  • Sure they will. Think of the tax revenue!

    • Zadan said...
    • User
    • 17 Oct 2010, 11:55
    "I dunno, you can say I'm just another nutcase, fine, but at least be honest with yourself - can you really trust the rulers of this world and take everything they say for granted?"

    Well the first mistake you have made is to assume that the United States is the entire world.

    Thankfully a large portion of the real world have a bit more reality based thinking compared to your leaders. That is why pot IS legal in quite a few countries around the world.

    It is close to being legalised in Australia, it is actually "decriminalised" in 2 states already. Which means, while it still is illegal, getting busted with it amounts to a on-the-spot fine (comparable with a parking ticket. You can only have a couple of oz though, any more and its a criminal offence and you get charged, goto court etc).

    I never believe the American government will legalise pot. They're religion won't allow it. Realistically, that is the only reason. Even if the American government was trying to control people's minds, I can guarantee you that pot would NOT do a damn thing to stop it. It would actually make people more susceptible (as does any mind altering drug).

    Please get your shit right, crazies like you make the rest of us look bad and keep the stuff illegal.

    Regards,

    David

  • Blame it on the Bilderberg Group and united unions.

    CONCRETE DANCEFLOOR
    • c4t2007 said...
    • User
    • 3 Dec 2010, 14:46
    I think the bible says that fragrant cane anointing oil should only be used on holy people. (Exodus 30:22-33)

    Then again, it also says "Wine is a mocker, strong drink is raging: and whosoever is deceived thereby is not wise." (Proverbs 20:1) and "Let us walk honestly, as in the day; not in rioting and drunkenness" (Romans 13:13).

    “Brazil’s cattle industry [...] is responsible for about 80 percent of all deforestation in the Amazon. In fact, the Brazilian cattle industry is the largest single source of deforestation anywhere in the world. And deforestation in turn causes one-fifth of all the greenhouse gas emissions in the world, more than all the world’s cars, trucks, trains, planes, and ships combined.” - Lindsey Allen, 2009. Actually one-tenth.
    Child labour: the tobacco industry's smoking gun
    Up to 90 percent of logging has ties to organized crime in some tropical countries.
    • [Deleted user] said...
    • User
    • 26 Jan 2011, 03:22
    It won't be legalized and if it ever is it won't happen in my life time. The Government can not control marijuana like alcohol. Prohibition on alcohol was not an easy task and even today you still have a few moonshiners here and there, though, not large enough to make a dent. If pot is legalized, I don't see a way to stop Joe Blow in Harlem or the suburbs from growing plants is his/her basement and selling to friends. It's much easier to grow pot than it is to moonshine. I think there would be too many independent dealers making profits that it would dent the Government's take too greatly for legalization. Though, isn't some better than none? I guess the Government wants all or nothing, imo. That's just what I've always thought. I'm fine with it being illegal. It doesn't, nor will it ever stop me.

  • It should be legal!

    Marijuana should be legal. There is no way that alcohol and tobacco should be legal and marijuana is not. That makes no sense at all. The government needs to wake up and realize how ridiculous it is to keep cannabis illegal.

    • Aerodis said...
    • User
    • 14 Mar 2011, 19:23
    Ah well... There is no need to legalize it where I come from! :D

    • c4t2007 said...
    • User
    • 6 Apr 2011, 20:13
    Aerodis said:
    Ah well... There is no need to legalize it where I come from! :D


    Aside from the electricity theft and fire hazards and now even gang fights over the ever-shrinking supply (which is still illegal) due to recent crackdowns, although that one coffeeshop was being harassed because it would take away business from local street dealers.

    “Brazil’s cattle industry [...] is responsible for about 80 percent of all deforestation in the Amazon. In fact, the Brazilian cattle industry is the largest single source of deforestation anywhere in the world. And deforestation in turn causes one-fifth of all the greenhouse gas emissions in the world, more than all the world’s cars, trucks, trains, planes, and ships combined.” - Lindsey Allen, 2009. Actually one-tenth.
    Child labour: the tobacco industry's smoking gun
    Up to 90 percent of logging has ties to organized crime in some tropical countries.
  • well... once we get some more practical people in congress, i think more steps will be taken to have it legalized. Smart congressmen and congresswomen who are not obsessed with family values and keeping the status quo will see marijuana legalization as part of a lesson learned from prohibition. These conservatives that currently have a majority in the house are wanting to lower the cannabis use of minors, but what they don't realize is that it's much easier for minors to obtain some green versus say, alcohol which is legal but reasonably regulated.

  • I think that in some countries it will be necessary to go out the streets and protest against goverment. but it will happen!




  • Re: Legalize it! - not gonna happen

    said:
    I just saw 'legalize it' posted in the shoutbox...

    THEY'RE NOT GONNA LEGALIZE IT.
    M.J. acts against their brainwashing techniques and makes the user see all of their propaganda more easily. Just switch on BBC, CBS, CNN or any other news channel, mute the sound, and observe for a while. Take a good look at how the information is presented.

    I dunno, you can say I'm just another nutcase, fine, but at least be honest with yourself - can you really trust the rulers of this world and take everything they say for granted?

    Why would they want to legalize something like that? No way that's ever happening with the current state of this planet...



    P.S. It's a shame so few people are going to read this.


    How true. Yet alcohol is glorified, because it has the opposite effect; it shuts down your thinking process.

    Here where I live (California), it is practically legal anyway. Anyone can get a card, and there's no shortage of medicinal shops. And the equivalent of a parking ticket if you get busted with cardless...

    Eventually, it may be legal. The US has traveled a long way since the 1980's.

  • Legalizing Marijuana

    Regardless of the DOJ's current assault on Medical Marijuana Patients and Distributors, a Gallup pole dated October 17, 2011 shows that 50% of Americans believe that Marijuana should be outright legalized and sold to 18+ and taxed like Alcohol. That means that the other 50% are split between No opinion and Against the legalization of Marijuana. That is a record high from a 40% record in 2009.

    When Gallup first asked about legalizing marijuana, in 1969, 12% of Americans favored it, while 84% were opposed. Support remained in the mid-20s in Gallup measures from the late 1970s to the mid-1990s, but has crept up since, passing 30% in 2000 and 40% in 2009 before reaching the 50% level in this year's Oct. 6-9 Gallup Poles annual Crime survey.

    There are currently 16 States + the District of Columbia that have passed Medical Marijuana Laws and currently 7 others that have Bills awaiting further action. If they pass that is 23 States that have at least decided that it indeed has medicinal properties.

    Don't listen to anyone who tells you that it is just to get High. I am a middle age Male in the US. I worked hard for most of my adult life in construction. Never needed help from anyone because I was superman. Top of my crew. Stayed clean for 16 yrs.to pass the drug tests and be a model employee and earn the mighty dollar.

    16 months ago I crushed most of the discs in my back and compressed all the others from neck to tailbone. I was given first Percocet, then Vicodin and finally Morphine. All they did was knock me out so that I wouldn't have to suffer during those lost hours. And when I would wake the first thing I would do is head for the opiates. That started to be my life. either in a mini-coma or so screwed up I couldn't participate in anything.

    About 3 months ago I mentioned Medical Marijuana to my Primary Dr. and he told me to go for it. So I got my card, bought some KUSH at the suggestion of my local dispensary and can now ease my pain with fewer pills. I have since bought strains such as Super Silver Haze and Trainwreck.

    Trainwreck got me high alright and Super Silver Haze was a nice head buzz but I still had more discomfort with those than the almost complete relief I get with any type of KUSH. The Dispensary was right. They told me KUSH was good for Nerve Pain.

    I got so impressed with this new found TRUTH that I started a blog to keep track of Medical Marijuana Strains and their reported medicinal uses and any side effects such as dry mouth or anxiety. That little bog of notes quickly turned into an informational resource for others. If your interested it is here http://whatsmedicalmarijuana.blogspot.com/.

    The point being that minds are changing about Marijuana and the truth is coming out. People are finally speaking up about it and I thank the younger adults for this. And when that younger group finally decides to Vote. It's going to be a shoe in.

    If I were a betting man I'd say within the next 10 years Marijuana will be a legal choice like alcohol.

    Find me on Facebook. I'm MMJ_Ptient.

    I like talking to others, agree with me or not. I'm open minded to anyone's point of view and will listen to what you say and consider what you are saying. Just be sure to bring your facts if you are trying to change my mind because I'll sure respond with facts. Don't tell me Marijuana is a gateway drug because I will tell you that most drug addicts will claim their first encounter with an intoxicant was alcohol given to them by a relative to take a sip from before the age of 10.

    Dennis H.
    Publisher "Arizona Prescribed Patient Newsletter"
  • It will be legal SOON.

    35,000 + CALIFORNIA PHYSICIANS CALL FOR OUTRIGHT LEGALIZATION OF CANNABIS

    Wednesday, 19 October 2011

    Sacramento, CA: The California Medical Association (CMA), representing over 35,000 physicians nationwide, has called for the 'legalization and regulation' of cannabis for adults, according to a white paper adopted by the group on Friday.

    The CMA paper, entitled 'Cannabis and the Regulatory Void,' recommends that cannabis be taxed and regulated "in a manner similar to alcohol." The paper also calls for the reclassification of cannabis under federal law "in order to encourage research leading to responsible regulation."

    It states: "In order to allow for a robust regulatory scheme to be developed, cannabis must be moved out of its current Schedule I status. ... Rescheduling cannabis will allow for further clinical research to determine the utility and risks of cannabis, which will then shape the national regulatory structure for this substance."

    The CMA is the largest physician group in California and the first statewide medical association to adopt an official position in favor of legalizing cannabis.

    In 2009, the CMA adopted a resolution acknowledging that the "criminalization of marijuana [is] a failed public health policy."

    From NORML:[url= http://norml.org/news/2011/10/19/california-state-s-largest-doctor-s-association-calls-for-legalizing-and-regulating-cannabis] http://norml.org/news/2011/10/19/california-state-s-largest-doctor-s-association-calls-for-legalizing-and-regulating-cannabis

    Dennis H.
    Publisher "Arizona Prescribed Patient Newsletter"
  • GALLUP POLE SAYS A RECORD HIGH 50% OF AMERICANS SAY LEGALIZE IT

    Wednesday, 19 October 2011

    Princeton, NJ: A record 50 percent of Americans now believe that marijuana ought to be legalized for adult use, according to a nationwide Gallup poll of 1,005 adults.

    The percentage of Americans favoring legalization is up four percent from 2010. It is the highest percentage ever recorded by Gallup, which has tracked public opinion data regarding marijuana policy since 1969.

    The 2011 survey results also mark the first time ever that Gallup has reported that more Americans support legalizing cannabis (50 percent) than oppose it (46 percent).

    Gallup reported that support for legalizing cannabis was highest among self-described liberals (69 percent) and those between the ages of 18 to 29 (62 percent). Support was weakest among Republicans (35 percent), self-described conservatives (34 percent), and those over the age of 65 (31 percent).

    Fifty-five percent of male respondents said they favored legalization versus only 46 percent of female respondents. Respondents' support for legalization was greatest in the west and Midwest regions of the country and weakest in the south. Since 2005, support for legalization has increased in every demographic polled by Gallup.

    "When Gallup first asked about legalizing marijuana, in 1969, 12 percent of Americans favored it. ... Support remained in the mid-20s ... from the late 1970s to the mid-1990s, but has crept up since, passing 30 percent in 2000 and 40 percent in 2009 before reaching the 50 percent level in this year's Oct. 6-9 annual Crime survey," the polling firm stated in a press release. "If this current trend on legalizing marijuana continues, pressure may build to bring the nation's laws into compliance with the people's wishes."

    The Gallup poll results are based on telephone interviews conducted October 6-9, 2011. It has a 4 percent margin of error.

    See it for yourself. Click here: http://www.gallup.com/poll/150149/Record-High-Americans-Favor-Legalizing-Marijuana.aspx

    Dennis H.
    Publisher "Arizona Prescribed Patient Newsletter"
  • FDA may legalize pot medicine, but only for Big Pharma

    by: Jonathan Benson, Natural News staff writer

    Visit NaturalNews.com


    (NaturalNews) The pressure is on for researchers and pharmaceutical companies to develop drug-based, non-synthetic versions of marijuana for medical use, as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is poised to approve such varieties in the near future. But this potential approval appears to be reserved only for Big Pharma, as the marijuana plant itself could continue to remain a controlled substance at the federal level with no recognized health benefits.

    The Associated Press (AP) reports that GW Pharma, a British pharmaceutical company, is currently undergoing advanced clinical trials for the world's first drug made from raw marijuana, which it will seek FDA approval for by the end of 2013. There are currently a number of synthetic cannabinoid drugs on the market that have been approved by the FDA, but none that incorporate actual marijuana (http://www.justice.gov/dea/ongoing/marinol.html).

    Known as Sativex, the marijuana spray contains both delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol, which are considered to be raw marijuana's two most well-known active components. GW Pharma is hoping to receive US FDA approval of Sativex for the treatment of cancer pain, as the drug has already been approved in several other countries for the treatment of muscle spasm pain caused by multiple sclerosis.

    While this is great news on the medical marijuana front in America, it does not necessarily imply that either the FDA or the US Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) will loosen its regulatory grip on the actual marijuana plant. Like regulators did with the stevia plant, marijuana could receive approval only in patented form from drug companies (http://www.healthynewage.com/blog/stevia-fda-approved/).

    "To the extent that companies can produce effective medication that utilizes the components of [marijuana], that's great. But that should not be the exclusive access for people who want to be able to use medical marijuana," said Kris Hermes, a spokesman from the pro-marijuana group Americans for Safe Access.

    "That's the race against time, in terms of how quickly can we put pressure on the federal government to recognize the plant has medical use versus the government coming out with the magic bullet pharmaceutical pill."

    If the federal government does approve Sativex and other drug-based forms of real marijuana, though, it will have to change its official position that marijuana has no medical benefits. If the plant's two most known ingredients are approved for medical use as a drug, in other words, the government's only choice to remain consistent will be to finally admit that marijuana does have medicinal value, and thus legalize it.

    Sources for this article include:

    http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=D9SE82EO0&show_article=1

    This article used by special permission
    Visit: NaturalNews.com

    Dennis H.
    Publisher "Arizona Prescribed Patient Newsletter"
  • White House: “We’re in the Midst of a Serious National Conversation on Marijuana”

    In October of 2011, the White House issued an official response to a petition NORML submitted via their We the People outreach program on the topic of marijuana legalization. Despite being one of the most popular petitions at the site’s launch, the answer we received was far from satisfactory. Penned by Drug Czar Gil Kerlikowske, the response featured most of the typical government talking points. He stated that marijuana is associated with addiction, respiratory disease, and cognitive impairment and that its use is a concern to public health. “We also recognize,” Gil wrote, “that legalizing marijuana would not provide the answer to any of the health, social, youth education, criminal justice, and community quality of life challenges associated with drug use.”

    Well, just over a year later, the White House has responded again to a petition to deschedule marijuana and legalize it. The tone this time is markedly different, despite being penned by the same man.

    Addressing the Legalization of Marijuana
    By Gil Kerlikowske

    Thank you for participating in We the People and speaking out on the legalization of marijuana. Coming out of the recent election, it is clear that we’re in the midst of a serious national conversation about marijuana.

    At President Obama’s request, the Justice Department is reviewing the legalization initiatives passed in Colorado and Washington, given differences between state and federal law. In the meantime, please see a recent interview with Barbara Walters in which President Obama addressed the legalization of marijuana.

    Barbara Walters:

    Do you think that marijuana should be legalized?

    President Obama:

    Well, I wouldn’t go that far. But what I think is that, at this point, Washington and Colorado, you’ve seen the voters speak on this issue. And as it is, the federal government has a lot to do when it comes to criminal prosecutions. It does not make sense from a prioritization point of view for us to focus on recreational drug users in a state that has already said that under state law that’s legal.

    …this is a tough problem because Congress has not yet changed the law. I head up the executive branch; we’re supposed to be carrying out laws. And so what we’re going to need to have is a conversation about how do you reconcile a federal law that still says marijuana is a federal offense and state laws that say that it’s legal.

    When you’re talking about drug kingpins, folks involved with violence, people are who are peddling hard drugs to our kids in our neighborhoods that are devastated, there is no doubt that we need to go after those folks hard… it makes sense for us to look at how we can make sure that our kids are discouraged from using drugs and engaging in substance abuse generally. There is more work we can do on the public health side and the treatment side.

    Gil Kerlikowske is Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy

    No tirade about protecting our children. No alarmist claims about sky rocketing marijuana potency and devastating addiction potential. Just a few short paragraphs stating we are “in the midst of a serious national conversation about marijuana” and deferring to an interview with the President where he stated arresting marijuana users wasn’t a priority and that the laws were still being reviewed. While far from embracing an end to marijuana prohibition, the simple fact that America’s Drug Czar had the opportunity to spout more anti-marijuana rhetoric and instead declined (while giving credence to the issue by stating it is a serious national conversation) it’s at the very least incredibly refreshing, if not a bit aberrational. We can only hope that when the administration finishes “reviewing” the laws just approved by resounding margins in Washington and Colorado, they choose to stand with the American people and place themselves on the right side of history.

    “We the People” are already there.

    Read Here: http://blog.norml.org/2013/01/08/white-house-were-in-the-midst-of-a-serious-national-conversation-on-marijuana/

    Arizona Prescribed Patient
    • [Deleted user] said...
    • User
    • 3 Jul 2014, 06:31
    Hello from 2014 in Pot-Legalized Washington State!

  • Fucking Finland! I hope someday that weed is legal here,but it can take many many years.I hope that i can see that day,because it is less harmful than tobacco and alcohol.And its also a medicine so many diseases,so its wrong that cannabis is illegal in my country,and we have a lot of weed smokers.LEGALIZE IT!! :)

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