• Cylob schrieb...
    • Benutzer
    • 8. Feb. 2008, 11:31
    halfadozen said:
    here's a list from a magazine, titled 25 perfect accesses to Jazz:

    Cannonball Adderley Quintet - Country Preacher

    Chet Baker - Let's Get Lost

    Ornette Coleman - Change of the Century

    John Coltrane - Live At Birdland

    Miles Davis - Cellar Door Sessions

    Charlie Haden - Liberation Music Orchestra

    Herbie Hancock - Sextant

    Billie Holiday - The Commodore Master Takes

    Jan Jelinek & Triosk - 1 + 3 + 1

    Rahsaan Roland Kirk - Volunteered Slavery

    The Lounge Lizards - Lounge Lizards

    Wynton Marsalis - From plantation to penitentiary

    Charles Mingus - Presents Charles Mingus

    Thelonious Monk - Brilliant Corners

    David Murray - Flowers for Albert

    Django Reinhardt - Best Of

    Sonny Rollins - On Impulse!

    Archie Shepp - Fire Music

    What do you experts say about this list? I know The Lounge Lizards arent a classical Jazz band, and the Jan Jelinek rec is a collaboration between him being a House Producer and a Jazz trio, but none the less...


    Is there a source for this list? I'd like to host it at the .com.

    Secret Snacker & Accomplished Pen Thief At:
  • it hasnt been published on the web yet (and im not sure if it ever will), but you can link up to the corresponding date of issue.

    don't ask me. ask
  • halfadozen said:
    here's a list from a magazine, titled 25 perfect accesses to Jazz:

    Cannonball Adderley Quintet - Country Preacher

    Chet Baker - Let's Get Lost

    Ornette Coleman - Change of the Century

    John Coltrane - Live At Birdland

    Miles Davis - Cellar Door Sessions...........["snip"]

    What do you experts say about this list? I know The Lounge Lizards arent a classical Jazz band, and the Jan Jelinek rec is a collaboration between him being a House Producer and a Jazz trio, but none the less...


    I'd say it's a list like the ones presented here on this forum, a fan's list, assembled for personal reasons and preferences. I'd like to hear/read the critical reasons for these 25 being the 25 "perfect" access points to jazz. And I wouldn't quibble over the Lounge Lizards or Jelinek on the list--nothing like that--I just would like to know what the thought process was, because this seems more like a shotgun approach.

    For those not familiar with the term, a shotgun's pattern is tight at close range but diffuse at a distance. At some distance, you will hit everything, but it will lack any force.

    So, individual albums, in isolation, might convince a listener to try a 2nd and then a 3rd jazz album. But the 25 albums, offered as a definition of the genre jazz as a whole, would leave the listener confused and likely to swear off music for at least a week or two.

    Now, it may just be me, but if you started someone off with Let's get Lost and Best of Django, and then followed up with Sextant or LMO, you might scare that person off experimentation in jazz whatever.

    Similarly, if they started with and dug Brilliant Corners and Change of the Century, and you then put on Jelinek...

    Not to say that it's a bad list of albums, but to suggest that there's any list of 25 "perfect access" points to jazz is to completely deny the listener any agency in this. Jazz is anti-hegemoneous & anti-homogeneous.

    So, again, I'm sure that the writer who assembled the list can support the inclusion of everyone of those albums on his/her list of great jazz albums, but I can make an argument against at least half as not suitable for introduction to that artist or that subgenre.

    but that's just me.

    jazzoetry is poetry--last poets
    In my writing I am acting as a map maker, an explorer of psychic areas, a cosmonaut of inner space, and I see no point in exploring areas that have already been thoroughly surveyed--William S. Burroughs
  • List: 25 Great Spiritual Jazz Albums

    Albert Ayler - Spiritual Unity (1964)
    Alice Coltrane - Huntington Ashram Monastery (1969)
    Don Cherry - Eternal Rhythm
    Frank Wright - Church Number 9 (1973)
    Grachan Moncur III - Echoes of Prayer
    John Coltrane - A Love Supreme (1964)
    Kalaparusha Maurice McIntyre - Humility in The Light of The Creator
    Pharoah Sanders - Deaf Dumb Blind (Summun Bukmun Umyun) (1970)
    Sun Ra - Discipline 27-II (1973)
    Wadada Leo Smith - Kulture Jazz


    count=10

    jazzoetry is poetry--last poets
    In my writing I am acting as a map maker, an explorer of psychic areas, a cosmonaut of inner space, and I see no point in exploring areas that have already been thoroughly surveyed--William S. Burroughs
  • Re:Re: More suggestions for spiritual jazz

    astro1_rohit said:
    Spiritual Jazz:

    Mary Lou Williams - Mary Lou's Mass (1975)
    Kalaparusha Maurice Mcintyre - Humility in The Light of The Creator
    Frank Lowe - Black Beings (1973)

    A question for Jazzbo Jammers desk: Myra Melford seems interesting.. I'm going to pick 'Where The Two Worlds Touch' (2004)[think she released that after visiting India.] Her albums are rated highly on rym..

    Also, tell us more about Jai Utthal (he sings kirtans?)


    Kalaparusha is already on there, I'll add the others (but c'mon guys, you know how to edit a list, right? I'm not editing the list, like saying this one makes it--this one doesn't, so I encourage everyone to add their new picks to the ongoing list)

    Myra Melford is definitely worth it. She is a great pianist with many trio and quartet albums. I am most familiar with the works from the decade of the 90s and would recommend any of them--usually for different reasons--but Alive in the House of Saints and The Same River Twice are ones I go back to often.

    If you like her, you might also like Henry Threadgill and/or Don Byron. All have similar compositional "sound" to me and all create damn fine music.

    Jai Uttal? I guess he crosses the line into so-called "world" music (apparently we in the western hemisphere call anything "world" if it includes African/Asian/Indigenous influences with some western sources). I wouldn't know a kirtan if it jumped up and bit me. But, I know that his debut album

    Footprints has sort of a Triloka Label house band including Don Cherry. I know that Uttal was born in the US (making him an American Indian Native instead of a Native American Indian, I guess) who "discovered" the music of his parents' country in his teens, and went off to study with Ali Akbar Khan. He sings, plays guitar, harmonium, banjo, whatever. The first three albums are fairly pleasing, jazz influenced, definitely with a "spiritual" sound.

    His later albums, focusing on the singing or yogic practices, I know nothing.

    jazzoetry is poetry--last poets
    In my writing I am acting as a map maker, an explorer of psychic areas, a cosmonaut of inner space, and I see no point in exploring areas that have already been thoroughly surveyed--William S. Burroughs
  • Re: List: 25 Great Spiritual Jazz Albums

    Albert Ayler - Spiritual Unity (1964)
    Alice Coltrane - Huntington Ashram Monastery (1969)
    Charles Tyler Ensemble - Charles Tyler Ensemble (1966)
    Don Cherry - Eternal Rhythm
    Frank Lowe - Black Beings (1975)
    Frank Wright - Church Number 9 (1973)
    Grachan Moncur III - Echoes of Prayer
    John Coltrane - A Love Supreme (1964)
    Kalaparusha Maurice McIntyre - Humility in The Light of The Creator
    Mary Lou Williams - Mary Lou's Mass (1975)
    Pharoah Sanders - Deaf Dumb Blind (Summun Bukmun Umyun) (1970)
    Sun Ra - Discipline 27-II (1973)
    Wadada Leo Smith - Kulture Jazz


    count=13 (2 from astro1_rohit and 1 more from -tgt-; man, you cats would have some strange ceremonies in your church!)

    jazzoetry is poetry--last poets
    In my writing I am acting as a map maker, an explorer of psychic areas, a cosmonaut of inner space, and I see no point in exploring areas that have already been thoroughly surveyed--William S. Burroughs
    • -tgt- schrieb...
    • Benutzer
    • 9. Feb. 2008, 18:42
    I'm sure you peeps may be familiar with this but I'll put it anyway for anybody: http://jazzsupreme.com/artists.html

  • Re: Re: List: 25 Great Spiritual Jazz Albums


    Albert Ayler - Spiritual Unity (1964)
    Alice Coltrane - Huntington Ashram Monastery (1969)
    Charles Tyler Ensemble - Charles Tyler Ensemble (1966)
    Don Cherry - Eternal Rhythm (1968)
    Frank Lowe - Black Beings (1975)
    Frank Wright - Church Number 9 (1973)
    Grachan Moncur III - Echoes of Prayer (1974)
    Hamid Drake & Michael Zerang - Ask the Sun (1991)
    Hannibal Marvin Peterson - The Angels of Atlanta (1981)
    John Coltrane - A Love Supreme (1964)
    Jonas Hellborg - The Word (1991)
    Kalaparusha Maurice McIntyre - Humility in The Light of The Creator
    Mary Lou Williams - Mary Lou's Mass (1975)
    Pharoah Sanders - Deaf Dumb Blind (Summun Bukmun Umyun) (1970)
    Sun Ra - Discipline 27-II (1973)
    Wadada Leo Smith - Kulture Jazz


    count=16

    Friends, this is a great looking list so far. Quite a range, deep variety--and from quiet introspection to full-on blow outs. thanks for your picks. keep them coming.

    jazzoetry is poetry--last poets
    In my writing I am acting as a map maker, an explorer of psychic areas, a cosmonaut of inner space, and I see no point in exploring areas that have already been thoroughly surveyed--William S. Burroughs
    • -tgt- schrieb...
    • Benutzer
    • 10. Feb. 2008, 22:29
    Albert Ayler - Spiritual Unity (1964)
    Alice Coltrane - Huntington Ashram Monastery (1969)
    Charles Tyler Ensemble - Charles Tyler Ensemble (1966)
    Don Cherry - Eternal Rhythm (1968)
    Donald Byrd - A New Perspective (1963)
    Duke Ellington & Mahalia Jackson - Black, Brown, & Beige (1958)
    Frank Lowe - Black Beings (1975)
    Frank Wright - Church Number 9 (1973)
    Grachan Moncur III - Echoes of Prayer (1974)
    Hamid Drake & Michael Zerang - Ask the Sun (1991)
    Hannibal Marvin Peterson - The Angels of Atlanta (1981)
    John Coltrane - A Love Supreme (1964)
    Jonas Hellborg - The Word (1991)
    Kalaparusha Maurice McIntyre - Humility in The Light of The Creator
    Mary Lou Williams - Mary Lou's Mass (1975)
    Pharoah Sanders - Deaf Dumb Blind (Summun Bukmun Umyun) (1970)
    Sun Ra - Discipline 27-II (1973)
    Wadada Leo Smith - Kulture Jazz

    count=18

    Sorry, new here, didn't know what was the regulation for adding things to the list.

    Bearbeitet von -tgt- am 10. Feb. 2008, 22:45
  • -tgt- said:
    Duke Ellington & Mahalia Jackson - Black, Brown, & Beige
    Donald Byrd - A New Perspective



    Are these for the latest list, Michael? That's my assumption, but...

    jazzoetry is poetry--last poets
    In my writing I am acting as a map maker, an explorer of psychic areas, a cosmonaut of inner space, and I see no point in exploring areas that have already been thoroughly surveyed--William S. Burroughs
    • -tgt- schrieb...
    • Benutzer
    • 10. Feb. 2008, 22:46
    yeah sorry i fixed it now

  • beelzbubba said:

    I'd like to hear/read the critical reasons for these 25 being the 25 "perfect" access points to jazz.


    the writer summed up some general infos about the albums and why he liked it, rather than why they are a good acces point.

    Now, it may just be me, but if you started someone off with Let's get Lost and Best of Django, and then followed up with Sextant or LMO, you might scare that person off experimentation in jazz whatever.

    Similarly, if they started with and dug Brilliant Corners and Change of the Century, and you then put on Jelinek...
    ...
    I can make an argument against at least half as not suitable for introduction to that artist or that subgenre.



    maybe that's why our/your subgenre lists are more splendid (or whatever), but i think the idea of making such a list is not that bad.






    i see your point. as im not really informed in jazz i just wanted to get some (funded) feedback (thanks for that btw).

    don't ask me. ask
  • halfadozen said:
    beelzbubba said:

    I'd like to hear/read the critical reasons for these 25 being the 25 "perfect" access points to jazz.


    the writer summed up some general infos about the albums and why he liked it, rather than why they are a good acces point.

    Now, it may just be me, but if you started someone off with Let's get Lost and Best of Django, and then followed up with Sextant or LMO, you might scare that person off experimentation in jazz whatever.

    Similarly, if they started with and dug Brilliant Corners and Change of the Century, and you then put on Jelinek...
    ...
    I can make an argument against at least half as not suitable for introduction to that artist or that subgenre.



    maybe that's why our/your subgenre lists are more splendid (or whatever), but i think the idea of making such a list is not that bad.

    i see your point. as im not really informed in jazz i just wanted to get some (funded) feedback (thanks for that btw).



    Oh, I agree that making that list is good, not bad. And giving some reasons for why he liked those particular selections = also good. And these are OUR lists, I hope. A one-way street is a lonely street.

    My reaction was to calling it 25 perfect access to jazz. And part of my problem with that is that as much as I like jazz, as long as I've listened to jazz, I wouuld have a hard time coming up with a list of 25 albums that I'd call the perfect access to jazz.

    Looking at that list--or, better, considering the list I've got in my head--I could call it 25 great jazz albums that got me into jazz. I'll give you that list now, but without the critical explanation (be glad to tell anyone more about any of the picks, maybe in the jazzbo thread?); so, as best as I can remember, the first 25 jazz albums I bought were...

    Gary Bartz - Harlem Bush Music
    Larry Coryell - Spaces
    Weather Report - I sing the Body Electric
    Weather Report - Weather Report
    Miles Davis - Bitches Brew
    Miles Davis - In A Silent Way
    Mahavishnu Orchestra - Inner Mounting Flame
    John McLaughlin - My Goals Beyond
    Art Ensemble of Chicago - A Jackson In Your House
    Don Cherry - Mu Part 1
    Don Cherry - Mu Part 2
    McCoy Tyner - Extensions
    Wayne Shorter - Speak No Evil
    Wayne Shorter - Moto Grosso Feio
    John Klemmer - All the Children Cried
    Elvin Jones - Mr. Jones
    John Coltrane - Africa Brass
    John Coltrane - A Love Supreme
    Art Ensemble of Chicago - Phase One
    Pharoah Sanders - Tauhid
    Joe Henderson - Inner Urge
    Lee Morgan - Live at the Lighthouse
    Elvin Jones - Live at the Lighthouse
    Eric Dolphy - Music Matador
    Yusef Lateef - Blues for the Orient
    Rahsaan Roland Kirk - The Inflated Tear
    Sun Ra - Cosmic Tones for Mental Therapy

    Those are just what comes off the top of my head and it leaves out tons that I picked up in my first year or two of listening to jazz (1970/1971).

    Would I say that these are the perfect introduction to jazz? Well, it was for me, of course, but it might not work for anyone else. In fact, I can remember taking some friends to see Rahsaan, and they were big Jethro Tull fans. So was I as far as that goes, but even after a few listens, I could tell that Ian Anderson was playing a derivative of Rahsaan (which he of course admits). And these guys left the show telling me I was full of shit, that Tull was the greatest band ever and "this" guy (Rahsaan) was just some novelty act. So clearly, not everyone is swayed by these "access" albums.

    jazzoetry is poetry--last poets
    In my writing I am acting as a map maker, an explorer of psychic areas, a cosmonaut of inner space, and I see no point in exploring areas that have already been thoroughly surveyed--William S. Burroughs
  • wow, thanks for that list. i'd love to hear more about some of these albums, just give me some time to get a few of them. i quite like the sound of saxophones so maybe i'll start off with the Pharoah Sanders rec.

    if these recs got one person into jazz, why not anyone else...

    (anyone/cylob (hehe) should link up the jazzbo thread to the VSM)

    don't ask me. ask
    • Cylob schrieb...
    • Benutzer
    • 11. Feb. 2008, 21:24
    Sorted

    Just as well I always read the smallprint.

    Secret Snacker & Accomplished Pen Thief At:
  • 25 Great Spiritual Jazz Albums


    Albert Ayler - Spiritual Unity (1964)
    Alice Coltrane - Huntington Ashram Monastery (1969)
    Charles Tyler Ensemble - Charles Tyler Ensemble (1966)
    Clifford Thornton - Ketchaoua (1969)
    David S. Ware - Godspelized (1998)
    Don Cherry - Eternal Rhythm (1968)
    Donald Byrd - A New Perspective (1963)
    Duke Ellington & Mahalia Jackson - Black, Brown, & Beige (1958)
    Frank Lowe - Black Beings (1975)
    Frank Wright - Church Number 9 (1973)
    Grachan Moncur III - Echoes of Prayer (1974)
    Hamid Drake & Michael Zerang - Ask the Sun (1991)
    Hannibal Marvin Peterson - The Angels of Atlanta (1981)
    John Coltrane - A Love Supreme (1964)
    Jonas Hellborg - The Word (1991)
    Kalaparusha Maurice McIntyre - Humility in The Light of The Creator (1969)
    Mary Lou Williams - Mary Lou's Mass (1975)
    Mtume Umoja Ensemble - Alkebu-Lan: Land of the Blacks (1972)
    Pharoah Sanders - Deaf Dumb Blind (Summun Bukmun Umyun) (1970)
    Sun Ra - Discipline 27-II (1973)
    Wadada Leo Smith - Kulture Jazz


    count=21

    jazzoetry is poetry--last poets
    In my writing I am acting as a map maker, an explorer of psychic areas, a cosmonaut of inner space, and I see no point in exploring areas that have already been thoroughly surveyed--William S. Burroughs
    • -tgt- schrieb...
    • Benutzer
    • 12. Feb. 2008, 19:17
    25 Great Spiritual Jazz Albums

    Albert Ayler - Spiritual Unity (1964)
    Alice Coltrane - Huntington Ashram Monastery (1969)
    Art Ensemble of Chicago - Bap-Tizum (1972)
    Charles Tyler Ensemble - Charles Tyler Ensemble (1966)
    Clifford Thornton - Ketchaoua (1969)
    David S. Ware - Godspelized (1998)
    Don Cherry - Eternal Rhythm (1968)
    Donald Byrd - A New Perspective (1963)
    Duke Ellington & Mahalia Jackson - Black, Brown, & Beige (1958)
    Frank Lowe - Black Beings (1975)
    Frank Wright - Church Number 9 (1973)
    Freddie Hubbard - Blue Spirits (1964)
    Grachan Moncur III - Echoes of Prayer (1974)
    Hamid Drake & Michael Zerang - Ask the Sun (1991)
    Hannibal Marvin Peterson - The Angels of Atlanta (1981)
    John Coltrane - A Love Supreme (1964)
    Jonas Hellborg - The Word (1991)
    Kalaparusha Maurice McIntyre - Humility in The Light of The Creator (1969)
    Larry Young - Lawrence Of Newark (1973)
    Mary Lou Williams - Mary Lou's Mass (1975)
    Mtume Umoja Ensemble - Alkebu-Lan: Land of the Blacks (1972)
    Pharoah Sanders - Deaf Dumb Blind (Summun Bukmun Umyun) (1970)
    Sun Ra - Discipline 27-II (1973)
    Wadada Leo Smith - Kulture Jazz

    count=24

    • cjcarne schrieb...
    • Benutzer
    • 13. Feb. 2008, 0:25
    What really got me started on jazz wasn't really any album or groups of albums. back in the mid 80's I was mostly listening to the wilder fringes of rock and would from time to time pick up the US fanzine Forced Exposure. Amongst the coverage of Sonic Youth, Big Black, The Butthole Surfers and such like, was some pretty enthusiastic attention to jazz. The huge review section always had plenty of seductive pieces on free and other 'out' jazz records. There just seemd a continuum between the weird rock shit I was into and all this stuff called jazz.

    The point is coming from the listening background I was, I'd have found a large proportion of those 'perfect accesses' a real turn off. Probably still would to be honest. So, for what it's worth (£3 3/- 5d in old money) here's my first twenty-fine garnered from the mid to late 80's (errors and omissions excepted).

    Ganelin Trio - Live in Berlin
    Ganelin Trio - Live in Moscow
    Jazz Group Arkhangelsk - S/T
    Peter Brotzmann Octet - Machine Gun
    Last Exit - S/T
    Last Exit - Iron Path
    Marilyn Crispell - Labyrinths
    Vinny Golia - The Gift of Fury
    Joe McPhee - Po Music
    Joe McPhee - A Future Retrospective
    Naked City - Torture Garden
    Bll Frisell - Lookout for Hope
    Albert Ayler - Spiritual Unity
    Cecil Taylor - Unit Structures
    Cecil Taylor - Dark Unto Themselves
    Sonny Sharrock - Guitar
    Sonny Sharrock - Ask the Ages
    Borbetomagus - Barbed Wire Maggots
    Hession Wilkinson Fell - Foom! Foom!
    Sun Ra - Space is the Place
    Art Ensemble of Chicago - Les Stances a Sophie
    John Coltrane - A Love Supreme
    John Coltrane - Ascension
    Billy Jenkins and the Voice of God Collective - Uncommerciality Vol. 1 & 2
    Ornette Coleman - Virgin Beauty

    Many I still listen to and like, some I've not listened to for a long while. A fair few would, no doubt, scare many folks off jazz completely but those are the ones that did it for me back in the day.

    Chief Slacker & Bat Chain Puller At:
    Desk Supervisor: Free Improvisation Artist Expert: Derek Bailey, Pere Ubu
    And remember, you get a free dead cat in each bar of Dead Cat Soap

  • cjcarne said:


    The point is coming from the listening background I was, I'd have found a large proportion of those 'perfect accesses' a real turn off. Probably still would to be honest. So, for what it's worth (£3 3/- 5d in old money) here's my first twenty-fine garnered from the mid to late 80's (errors and omissions excepted).

    /snip/

    Many I still listen to and like, some I've not listened to for a long while. A fair few would, no doubt, scare many folks off jazz completely but those are the ones that did it for me back in the day.




    That's some list, cj. Only a couple that I have never heard/heard of (Archangeslk, Billy Jenkins, Hessian Wilkinson Fell are the ones I've never heard of, the Golia and the ornette are the ones I've never heard).

    But yeah, exactly the issue you raise is why I have little use for "perfect access" lists. Put Chet Baker on for you in the mid 80s and you'd no doubt have said--"see that's why I hate jazz." Probably still would (I know I would gag). And the converse, too. I wouldn't put Borbetomagus on for someone who liked girl-pop or shoegaze.

    The Ganelin Trio are ones I've first heard about 4 years ago--I think I have Old Wine New Bottles and one other, but along with Alexander Schlippenbach and Cecil Taylor, some of my favorite piano based free jazz.

    jazzoetry is poetry--last poets
    In my writing I am acting as a map maker, an explorer of psychic areas, a cosmonaut of inner space, and I see no point in exploring areas that have already been thoroughly surveyed--William S. Burroughs
  • sjugge said:
    would like to explore some more jazz à la John Coltrane's - Olé (the track)... most wicked jazz song in my humble opinion...

    cheers


    Suggestions for tracks like Olé...I'll recommend some tracks and I think I'll take liberties and extrapolate to albums that you might like based on that one thin slice.

    Tracks:
    Eric Dolphy - Music Matador

    This tune was written by Prince Lasha and Sonny Simmons and features Dolphy, Lasha, Simmons, Clifford Jordan, and Richard Davis. It's available on a lot of different albums, usually with Dolphy's version of Jitterbug Waltz. The more I think about it, the more tenuous the connection with Olé, but maybe it'll grow on you. From the opening Davis bass strum, I'm hooked.

    Charles Mingus - Cumbia and Jazz Fusion

    This one is kind of all over the map, but at 28 minutes, what wouuld you expect. There's a veritable history of jazz embedded.

    McCoy Tyner - Sama Layuca
    Hutcherson nearly steals the show here, but Tyner is at the top of his game here, too.

    Dewey Redman - Qow
    Dewey Redman - Look for the Black Star

    Albums

    Coltrane - Africa Brass

    Dolphy doesn't get enough credit as arranger and orchestra director on this years-ahead recording. Ole was part of the same recording sessions, but with the smaller ensemble.

    Michael White - Land of Spirit and Light

    McCoy Tyner - Asanté

    Charles Mingus - New Tijuana Moods

    and this next one is a little further afield, but features great latin rhythms and blistering piano from Don Pullen:

    Kip Hanrahan - Tenderness

    and on the subject of Don Pullen,

    Don Pullen - Kele Mou Bana

    and another piano led date

    Abdullah Ibrahim - African Marketplace

    I think all of these carry some portion of wicked jazz that you asked for. Let me know what you think.

    jazzoetry is poetry--last poets
    In my writing I am acting as a map maker, an explorer of psychic areas, a cosmonaut of inner space, and I see no point in exploring areas that have already been thoroughly surveyed--William S. Burroughs
    • Cylob schrieb...
    • Benutzer
    • 15. Feb. 2008, 11:11
    New Desk:

    Smooth Jazz

    Secret Snacker & Accomplished Pen Thief At:
  • Cylob said:
    New Desk:

    Smooth Jazz


    Why? Did someone ask for this?
    I guess I prefer to call it Adult Contemporary Instrumental. That way we don't get into the whole Kenny G argument.

    btw, lest anyone's ox feel gored, I am amused, not upset, over the whole genre of "smooooooove" jazz.

    jazzoetry is poetry--last poets
    In my writing I am acting as a map maker, an explorer of psychic areas, a cosmonaut of inner space, and I see no point in exploring areas that have already been thoroughly surveyed--William S. Burroughs
  • 25 27 Great Spiritual Jazz Albums

    //editor's note: I am always reluctant to remove someone else's selections to these lists. The purpose of these lists I see as at least twofold--we build a community resource through a dialogue of great jazz, and for those exploring a genre, we offer a list of recommendations as a jumping off point to other explorations.

    I know that many albums can be slotted into several genres, and I also am aware that one person's definition of the genre does not have to carry the same borders that another sees. But, perhaps more than others, I want these lists to be aware of the conversations that have preceded them. That's why, since the lists are targeted at a length of 25, convention has been to limit to one entry per artist. In the albums that follow, three entries have been included on recent lists--one by me! I wouldn't necessarily exclude them from this list, but I've added three to the list, taking it to 27. If listener's have been paying attention, they should already have Bap-tizum and Lawrence of Newark, anyway. Everyone should. The Mtume Umoja Ensemble is more for the committed.
    //

    Albert Ayler - Spiritual Unity (1964)
    Alice Coltrane - Huntington Ashram Monastery (1969)
    Art Ensemble of Chicago - Bap-Tizum (1972)
    Charles Tyler Ensemble - Charles Tyler Ensemble (1966)
    Clifford Thornton - Ketchaoua (1969)
    David S. Ware - Godspelized (1998)
    Don Cherry - Eternal Rhythm (1968)
    Donald Byrd - A New Perspective (1963)
    Duke Ellington & Mahalia Jackson - Black, Brown, & Beige (1958)
    Frank Lowe - Black Beings (1975)
    Frank Wright - Church Number 9 (1973)Freddie Hubbard - Blue Spirits (1964)
    Grachan Moncur III - Echoes of Prayer (1974)
    Hamid Drake & Michael Zerang - Ask the Sun (1991)
    Hannibal Marvin Peterson - The Angels of Atlanta (1981)
    John Coltrane - A Love Supreme (1964)
    Jonas Hellborg - The Word (1991)
    Kalaparusha Maurice McIntyre - Humility in The Light of The Creator (1969)
    Larry Young - Lawrence Of Newark (1973)
    Mary Lou Williams - Mary Lou's Mass (1975)
    Mtume Umoja Ensemble - Alkebu-Lan: Land of the Blacks (1972)
    Nicole Mitchell & The Black Earth Ensemble - Afrika Rising (2002)
    Pharoah Sanders - Deaf Dumb Blind (Summun Bukmun Umyun) (1970)
    Sun Ra - Discipline 27-II (1973)
    Wadada Leo Smith - Kulture Jazz
    Wynton Marsalis - In This House, On This Morning (1992)
    Yusef Lateef/Adam Rudolph/Go: Organic Orchestra - In the Garden (2003)

    count=27

    jazzoetry is poetry--last poets
    In my writing I am acting as a map maker, an explorer of psychic areas, a cosmonaut of inner space, and I see no point in exploring areas that have already been thoroughly surveyed--William S. Burroughs
  • beelzbubba said:

    If listener's have been paying attention, they should already have Bap-tizum and Lawrence of Newark, anyway. Everyone should.//


    Sorry, I was in an agnostic mode when I heard those records ;)


    Okay... another list?

    how about 25 great jazz albums (i) that have great drummers/ percussions. (ii) noise jazz albums (iii) by female musicians (iv) vocal jazz..

    suggestions & consensus.

  • Rohit tosses 'em up, we serve 'em...

    Lists to work on...

    Great Jazz Drumming Albums (need not be led by drummer, but must show exemplary drumming)

    Noise Jazz Albums (need more of a genre definition here. Mouldy figs consider anything post-Kind Of Blue to be Noise Jazz)

    Led By Women, 25 great jazz albums with women as the leader

    Vocal Jazz.


    My preference order is...
    1. Led by Women
    2. Great Jazz Drumming
    3. Noise jazz
    4. Vocal jazz


    of course, with my stated prejudices, I will have to sit out vocal jazz. I use those cds for coasters or clay pigeons.

    jazzoetry is poetry--last poets
    In my writing I am acting as a map maker, an explorer of psychic areas, a cosmonaut of inner space, and I see no point in exploring areas that have already been thoroughly surveyed--William S. Burroughs
Anonyme Benutzer dürfen keine Beiträge schreiben. Bitte log dich ein oder registriere dich, um Beiträge in den Foren schreiben zu können.